Monthly Archives: November 2016

Bibliography: Sojourner Truth (page 1 of 2)

This bibliography is reformatted and customized by the Center for Positive Practices for the Black Lives & Me website. Some of the authors featured on this page include Adelaide Haas, Rosemarie Arbur, English Journal, Mary Ruthsdotter, Karlyn Kohrs Campbell, Windsor National Women's History Project, Nancy Lobb, Bevin A. Romans, Hortense D. Lloyd, and Robert C. Baron.

Baron, Robert C., Ed.; And Others (1989). Soul of America: Documenting Our Past, 1492-1974. Compiled by historians, the documents and speeches in this volume span 5 centuries of thought in the United States. These documents represent the full scope of U.S. history, from the earliest settlements, through the western expansion, to the era when the United States became a world power. The book contains materials by Coronado, William Penn, Roger Williams, William Bradford, Thomas Jefferson, Thomas Paine, Benjamin Franklin, Red Jacket, Tecumseh, Chief Joseph, John C. Calhoun, Daniel Webster, Henry Clay, Abraham Lincoln, Robert E. Lee, Frederick Douglass, Booker T. Washington, Martin Luther King, Jr., Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Susan B. Anthony, Sojourner Truth, and 16 U.S. presidents. Some choices were based on their long-term influence, some on the beauty of the language and the expression of major ideas. Each document is introduced by a short essay describing its historical context. The volume is organized in chronological order, includes a 15-item bibliography, and identifies sources for the documents. Descriptors: Civil War (United States), Colonial History (United States), Modern History, Presidents

Romans, Bevin A. (1993). Sojourner Truth as an Essential Part of Rhetorical Theory. To affirm Sojourner Truth as a powerful rhetor who advanced the equality and empowerment of women, a study examined several of her speeches on women's suffrage. Although the value of using such role models as Sojourner Truth has been demonstrated in various grade levels, and in the study of history and English, the approach is too seldom employed in today's college classes studying rhetorical criticism. Additional analysis of this female voice is overdue in the field of speech communication. The goal of Sojourner Truth's life was to move the United States toward equality of the sexes, making it appropriate that the critical method used in the study is that of feminist criticism. The study analyzed how in these speeches, and from her perspective as a freed female slave of African descent, Sojourner Truth presented the situation of women; how women perceived society; and the way Sojourner Truth challenged post-Civil War assumptions about females. (The three speeches analyzed are attached. Contains 21 references.)   [More]  Descriptors: Blacks, Discourse Analysis, Females, Higher Education

National Women's History Project, Windsor, CA. (1994). Myself and Women Heroes in My World. National Women's History Project. This guide presents biographies of the following women: Sojourner Truth, Harriet Tubman, Queen Liliuokalani, Amelia Earhart, Maria Tallchief, and Sonia Manzano. The use of biographies as history provides historical information and role models in a form comprehensible to young students. The personal history booklet that concludes this document serves as a guide to help students understand that they, too, will have a role in history. It basically demonstrates to students that people like themselves can make history. Descriptors: Curriculum Guides, Elementary Education, Females, Social Studies

Lobb, Nancy (1995). 16 Extraordinary African Americans. This collection for children tells the stories of 16 African Americans who helped make America what it is today. African Americans can take pride in the heritage of these contributors to society. Biographies are given for the following: (1) Sojourner Truth, preacher and abolitionist; (2) Frederick Douglass, abolitionist; (3) Harriet Tubman, leader in helping slaves escape; (4) Ida B. Wells-Barnett, journalist; (5) Mary McLeod Bethune, educator; (6) Booker T. Washington, educator and founder of Tuskegee Institute; (7) W. E. B. Du Bois, scholar and advocate of black rights; (8) George Washington Carver, botanist; (9) Jackie Robinson, baseball star; (10) Thurgood Marshall, Supreme Court Justice; (11) Shirley Chisholm, Congresswoman; (12) Martin Luther King, Jr., civil rights leader; (13) Malcolm X, black rights leader; (14) Marian Wright Edelman, child advocate; (15) Jesse Jackson, civil rights leader; and (16) Maya Angelou, author and poet. Questions and activities for further learning and guidelines for teachers are included. Descriptors: Black Culture, Black History, Blacks, Childrens Literature

Lloyd, Hortense D. (1992). The Agonies and Survival Techniques of Black Females and Their Implications for Improving the Plight of Black Males in America, Negro Educational Review. Briefly describes the lives of important African-American women, detailing the challenges they faced and how they survived from Sojourner Truth to Alice Walker. Suggests that the strengths and lessons of the lives of these women may shed light on how to help African-American males. Descriptors: Authors, Biographies, Black Achievement, Black Culture

Haas, Adelaide (1979). Sojourner Truth–A Woman of Strength and Vision. Based upon research conducted during the past decade that identifies speech features of form, topic, content, and use of language as male- or female-associated, this paper examines the rhetoric of Sojourner Truth in reference to these features. It classifies her directness, originality, and action as male-associated and her modesty, emotionalism, and sensitivity as female-associated. It concludes that hers was an androgynous speech that was not limited by genderlect. Descriptors: Black History, Black Leadership, Females, Language Styles

Larkins, A. Guy (1988). Hero, Place, and Value: Using Biography and Story in Elementary Social Studies, Georgia Social Science Journal. States that because of an unclear rationale for instructional goals, the expanding environment organizational scheme results in trivial course content. Recommends that elementary social studies be guided by a citizenship education rationale. Two illustrative lessons, using story, biography, and historical narrative, are provided: Sojourner Truth and "Knots on a Counting Rope." Descriptors: Biographies, Citizenship Education, Course Content, Curriculum Development

English Journal (2005). What Text Have You Successfully Used to Reveal One or More of the Many Voices of Democracy?. Three English teachers from the US have described about the texts they have used to expose their students to exercise their voices in a participatory democracy. The English teachers have used films like Sojourner Truth, Avalon, and Erin Brockovich to teach students the importance of voice of democracy.   [More]  Descriptors: Democracy, English Instruction, English Teachers, Instructional Materials

Arbur, Rosemarie (1977). Semantics and Sojourner Truth. Sojourner Truth's "Ain't I a Woman?" speech is presented in this paper and shown to be an effective vehicle for helping students discover the power of language and of literature. The paper first discusses the potentially destructive way English teachers sometimes tell students about "hidden meanings" in long and complex works and suggests that, to interest students in semantics, teachers should begin modestly. It then presents a witness's account of Sojourner Truth's speech, made in response to speeches by several ministers who opposed women's demands for suffrage, and shows ways that the speech can be discussed with students. It demonstrates how teachers can elicit meanings for the word "little" as used by Sojourner Truth in disputing the word of "dat little man in black dar" and how they can draw attention to the influence of Sojourner's speech upon her audience, to show students the power of words. Descriptors: English Instruction, Higher Education, Language Usage, Literature Appreciation

National Women's History Project, Windsor, CA. (1998). Women Putting Our Stamp on America: Biographies and Activities for National Women's History Month, March 1999. This booklet, intended for use by educators and by workplace and community organizers, introduces women who have been featured on U.S. postage stamps as well as a few of the women who clearly merit such honor in the future. Postage stamps featuring women have been relatively few and far between and have only skimmed the surface of U.S. women in history. This booklet contains more than 40 biographies of exemplary women, including Jane Addams, Juliette Low, Clara Barton, Rachel Carson, Willa Cather, Amelia Earhart, "Ma" Rainey, Eleanor Roosevelt, Sacajawea, Sojourner Truth, and Mildred "Babe" Didrikson Zaharias. The booklet also contains 12 suggestions for classroom activities and information on how to nominate other U.S. women for commemorative postage stamps. A sample stamp design and a "matching" game also are featured. Descriptors: Biographies, Class Activities, Elementary Secondary Education, Females

Campbell, Karlyn Kohrs (1986). Style and Content in the Rhetoric of Early Afro-American Feminists, Quarterly Journal of Speech. Analyzes selected speeches by feminists active in the early Afro-American protest, revealing differences in their rhetoric and that of White feminists of the period. Argues that a simultaneous analysis and synthesis is necessary to understand these differences. Illustrates speeches by Sojourner Truth, Ida B. Wells, and Mary Church Terrell. Descriptors: Civil Rights, Feminism, Persuasive Discourse, Public Speaking

National Women's History Project, Windsor, CA. (1992). Las Heroinas en el Mundo Mio y Yo (Myself and Women Heroes in My World). This book offers a series of lesson plans and resources for teaching young learners (K-3) about heroines in U.S. history. The book offers general guidelines for presentation of the materials as well as specific suggestions for individual lessons. Each lesson focuses on a particular historical figure and includes a biography, a lesson plan outline, sample discussion questions, and reproducible visual aids. The women explored in the guide are: Sojourner Truth, Harriet Tubman, Queen Liliuokalani, Amelia Earhart, Maria Tallchief, and Sonia Manzano. The final activity involves the student creating a personal history. Both the text and the materials are in Spanish. Descriptors: Bilingual Education, Elementary Education, Females, Primary Education

Ruthsdotter, Mary (1992). "Celebrate Women's History": Coloring Poster Activity Booklet. This booklet contains biographical information about Bessie Coleman, Nellie Bly, Gertrude Ederle, Sojourner Truth, Chien-Shiung Wu, Yoshiko Uchida, Madam C. J. Walker, Maria Martinez, Jovita Idar, Margaret Bourke-White, Sally Ride, and Sybil Ludington. These women are noted for their important contributions to United States history. It is hoped their lives and contributions inspire other women to become leaders in society as well. A quiz, a list of activities, and discussion questions are provided with guide. A 12-item bibliography concludes the text. Descriptors: Biographies, Elementary Secondary Education, Females, Social Studies

Hakim, Joy (1994). Liberty for All? A History of US: Book Five. This volume is book 5 in a 10 part series on U.S. history for children. The book tells the story of the Antebellum era–especially the story of children from a variety of backgrounds. Some of the characters depicted in this volume include Jedediah Smith, Davy Crockett, John Quincy Adams, Emily Dickinson, Sojourner Truth, John James Audubon, and Dred Scott. Topics included are the westward expansion of the United States, the growth of cities, industrialization, and slavery. The book contains photographs, drawings, maps, graphics, and cartoons that make the chapters understandable and entertaining. Additional resources include a chronology of events and a list of more books to read. The book, designed to support the upper elementary and secondary school social studies curriculum, contains an extensive index, in-depth bibliography of young adult literature, and descriptive chronology of historical events. Descriptors: Black History, Constitutional History, Instructional Materials, Intermediate Grades

1996 (1996). African Americans Who Made a Difference. 15 Plays for the Classroom. These easy-to-read classroom plays are about 15 African American men and women in a variety of vocations. The plays are designed to enhance the curriculum and to make social studies come alive for the student as they bolster language-arts teaching. Each play includes a Teacher's Guide that contains some quotes from the featured person and a brief biography. A bibliography lists age-appropriate titles to help children learn more about these people. The guide ends with activities designed to strengthen students' thinking, oral, writing, and research skills. The plays are about: (1) Alvin Ailey, Jr.; (2) Romare Bearden; (3) George Washington Carver; (4) Shirley Chisholm; (5) Frederick Douglass; (6) Langston Hughes; (7) Martin Luther King, Jr.; (8) Thurgood Marshall; (9) Rosa Parks; (10) Jackie Robinson; (11) Sojourner Truth; (12) Harriet Tubman; (13) Ida B. Wells-Barnett; (14) Phillis Wheatley; and (15) Malcolm X. Descriptors: Biographies, Blacks, Cultural Awareness, Cultural Enrichment

Bibliography: Malcolm X (page 7 of 7)

This bibliography is reformatted and customized by the Center for Positive Practices for the Black Lives & Me website. Some of the authors featured on this page include Springfield. Illinois Community Coll. Board, Nancy D. Padak, Finley C. Campbell, New York American Council of Learned Societies, Thomas John, Edwin Hamilton, Richard W. Williams, Thomas J. Porter, Atlanta Cable News Network, and Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication..

Campbell, Finley C. (1970). Voices of Thunder, Voices of Rage: A Symbolic Analysis of a Selection from Malcolm X's Speech, Message to the Grass Roots, Speech Teacher. Descriptors: Analytical Criticism, Black Attitudes, Black Leadership, Black Literature

Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication. (1992). Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (75th, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, August 5-8, 1992). More Miscellaneous Studies. The More Miscellaneous Studies section of the proceedings contains the following 34 papers: "The Louisville Courier-Journal's News Content after Purchase by Gannett" (Hansen and Coulson); "Reflection of Cultural Values in Advertising: A Comparative Analysis of Taiwan and U.S. Advertising" (Zandpour and Qian); "Sex, Violence and Consonance/Diversity: An Analysis of Local TV News Values" (Davie); "Science and Technology: When Do They Become Front Page News?" (Ramsey); "Persons with Disabilities and Mass Media" (Tait); "Effectiveness of Trade Magazine Advertising" (Shu-Fen Li and others); "'What Did You Do during the War, Mother?' Propagandistic Communications in Crisis Situations" (Shachar); "Winners and Losers: Making It in the Magazine Marketplace 1986-90" (David E. Sumner); "The Lanham Act and Copyright" (Harris and Tomlinson); "Significant Silences: Selected Newspaper Coverage of Problems Facing Black Americans" (Martindale); "Trial by Newspaper: The Strange Case of Dr. Karl Muck" (Kagan); "Trends in Daily Newspaper Costs and Revenues 1978-1990" (Stanley and Tharp); "Sexual Harassment of Washington Women Journalists" (McAdams and Beasley); "Through the Eyes of Gender and Hollywood: Conflicting Visions of Isak Dinesen's Africa" (Cooper and Descutner); "Network Commercials Promote Legal Drugs: Outnumber Anti-Drug PSA's 45-to-1" (Fedler and others); "The Effects of the Mood Generated by Television Program in Advertising and Product Evaluation" (Batista and Biocca); "Fifty Years of Disability Coverage in 'The New York Times'" (Clogston); "A Stubborn Faith: The Media and the Amish" (Mason and Nanney); "Market Subordination and Secret Combinations: Scripps Howard Newspapers and the Origin of Joint Operating Agreements" and "A Comparison of Local Editorial Issues in Competitive, Joint Monopoly, and Joint Operating Agreement Newspapers" (Adams); "The Law of Libel and Public Speech in Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Mississippi and South Carolina" (Nevious); "Rental of Feature Film on Videocassette: Changes in Industry Structure and Consumer Behavior from the Perspective of the Rental Store" (Prince); "The Founding of IRE and the Practice of Investigative Journalism" (Aucoin); "Should Executions Be Televised?" (Widener and Kim); "Daily Newspaper Readership: Four Types of Local Newspaper Readers Mirror ASNE Findings" (Sylvester and others); "Tunisia's Response to the Advent of European Direct Broadcast Satellite Television" (Adhoum); "A Comparative Study of Journalism and Gender in France" (McMane); "Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Connor's First Amendment Approach to Free Expression" (Goodman); "Romancing the Coffee: New Trends in Contemporary Product Advertising" (Kretchmer and Carveth); "Black Entertainment Television: Seeking Dr. King or Slouching toward Malcolm X?" (Barchak); "Beyond Reason: A Feminist Theory of Ethics for Journalists" (Scott); "Organizational Communication Deficits and Overloads: The Origins of Entropy in the News Room" (Incitti); "We Are the World: Narcissism and Global Solidarity" (Shing-Ling Sarina Chen); and "Using Contract Law to Protect News Sources Who Enter Confidentiality Agreement with Journalists" (Alexander).   [More]  Descriptors: Advertising, Black Culture, Cultural Context, Disabilities

Illinois Community Coll. Board, Springfield. (1992). Fall 1986 First-Time Community College Student Transfer Study. In 1992, 27 Illinois community college districts (38 colleges) participated in a national transfer study conducted by the Center for the Study of Community Colleges (CSCC). The purpose of the study was to test a model for calculating transfer rates which used as its cohort group those students entering a community college in fall 1986 with no prior college experience who had earned at least 12 college-level semester credit hours. Included in the study were those 45,795 students who initially had enrolled in baccalaureate/transfer, occupational, and general associate degree programs at Illinois's community colleges. Using the CSCC transfer model, the overall transfer rate for Illinois was 24.1%. However, determining multiple rates based on distinct pools of students more realistically depicted the nature of transfer. For example, the rate for students from baccalaureate/transfer programs was 32.6%, while the rate for students who indicated that they intended to transfer was 40.4%. Ascertaining multiple rates also revealed differences in course-taking and transfer behavior among racial/ethnic groups. Asians had the second highest percentage of students earning at least 12 credit hours (50.2%) and the highest transfer rate (29.3%). For baccalaureate/transfer students, the difference between the highest transfer rate for White students (35.6%) and the lowest for Black students (18.5%) was 17.1 percentage points. Percentages of students earning the 12 credit hour minimum and transfer rates differed significantly among community colleges as well. Overall, the percentage of students earning the credit minimum ranged from 67.4% (Olney Central) to 17.5% (City Wide), with the statewide figure at 47%. Transfer rates ranged from 35% (Kishwaukee) to 8% (Malcolm X), with the statewide rate for the participating colleges at 24.1%. Data tables are provided.   [More]  Descriptors: College Credits, College Transfer Students, Community Colleges, Comparative Analysis

Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA. (1997). CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides. June, 1997. These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of June, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Topics include: France gets a new government and Prime Minister as the Socialist Party defeats the Conservative Party, widow of Malcolm X in critical condition after sustaining injuries in fire, Oklahoma City bombing case jury finds Timothy McVeigh guilty on all 11 counts, evacuations in Sierra Leone, Ireland peace talks resume, worldwide demonstrations mark the eighth anniversary of China's crackdown in Tiananmen Square, and international observers monitor parliamentary elections in Algeria (June 2-6); election results for the Republic of Ireland, Algerian election marred by controversy, Mideast peace talks revived, U.S. President Clinton proposes 5-year ban on human cloning, violence in the Republic of Congo (formerly Zaire), South Korea sends food to North Korea, Dow Jones breaks record high, computer software companies Microsoft and Netscape team up to offer a security program to protect personal privacy on the Internet, and President Clinton signs the Disaster Relief Bill (June 9-13); Timothy McVeigh receives death sentence in Oklahoma City bombing case, 25th anniversary of burglary of Democratic Party headquarters at Watergate, Britain suspends talks with Sinn Fein, European Union leaders meet in Amsterdam, law banning sexual discrimination by schools receiving federal funds is 25 years old, Saudi bombing suspect in custody, pause in Republic of Congo hostilities, Cambodian leader Pol Pot surrenders, Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) terrorism suspect is captured, and Russia joins "G-7" to create the Summit of Eight in Denver (CO) (June 16- 20); tobacco companies and attorneys-general of several states hammer out a landmark agreement, Earth Summit opens in New York, Wall Street stock drop, Britain and China agree to early army presence in Hong Kong, U.S. Air Force releases report debunking speculation that aliens crash landed in Roswell (NM) 50 years ago, Ukraine blames former USSR for Chernobyl disaster, a collision causes the latest problem to challenge the MIR space station crew, and Internet users differ over Supreme Court ruling on free speech rights in cyberspace (June 23-27); and the British handover of Hong Kong to the People's Republic of China (June 30). Descriptors: Cable Television, Class Activities, Current Events, Discussion (Teaching Technique)

Williams, Richard W. (1981). Developing a Peer Tutoring Program: A Self-Instructional Module. This two-part module was prepared to assist instructors in designing and implementing a peer tutoring program. After introductory material and the presentation of a rationale for peer tutoring, Part I begins by stating learning objectives and providing a pretest. It then presents an overview of peer tutoring, outlining a systematic tutoring program. This section continues with a description of five steps in an implementation procedure, including the selection and recruitment of tutors, the identification of instructional resources, the determination of who will be served, and the evaluation and modification of the tutoring program. A sample evaluation questionnaire is included. Part II, a peer tutoring manual, begins with an introduction to the concept of peer tutoring and nine learning objectives. After the tutors' pretest, the manual suggests ten learning activities for the tutor which focus on subject matter review, personal attitude assessment, investigation of the tutor's role, hypothetical tutoring situations, designing learning activities for tutees, identifying additional resources, record keeping, and a personal growth seminar. The manual concludes with a pretest. Appendices include answer keys, papers on the role of a tutor and on the community college student, a description of a procedure for a tutoring assignment, discussions and exercises related to tutorial problems and potential solutions, suggestions for record keeping, and an essay on writing tutorial objectives. Descriptors: Behavioral Objectives, Community Colleges, Learning Modules, Peer Teaching

American Council of Learned Societies, New York, NY. (1995). Poetry in and out of the Classroom: Essays from the ACLS Elementary and Secondary Schools Teacher Curriculum Development Project. ACLS Occasional Paper, No. 29. This volume contains five essays on the uses of poetry and one poem by elementary and secondary teachers involved in a project to encourage teachers to develop the habit of scholarship as the basis for their teaching. In the first essay, "Female Poets of the First World War: A Study in Diversity for the Fifth Grade Social Studies Curriculum," Randy Cummings explains this little known body of poetry and demonstrates how to use it in the classroom. In "Ghosts Among Us/Ancestral Voices: 'What's Past is Prologue'" Terry Moreland Henderson draws on Foxfire oral history techniques to elicit a spectrum of oral histories from the diverse backgrounds of her Los Angeles (California) students. In "Poetry from the Far Side" Phyllis B. Schwartz uses a cartoon about adolescence in different species–a parallel to the differing ethnic and cultural backgrounds in many schools–to evoke poetry from students who denied interest in poetry and in sharing emotions in the classroom. "Sestina for a Grande Dame" by Fredric Lown is a poem, a memoir of Lown's grandmother. In "The Overwhelming Question: Integrating the ACLS Curriculum Project, 'Teaching for Understanding,' and 'The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock,'" Joan Soble describes show teaching and relationships enrich her understanding of the traditional curriculum. In "A Matter of Trust" Richard Young analyzes "truth" in the writings of Robert Lowell, Alex Haley, and Malcolm X. (Most essays contain references.)   [More]  Descriptors: Adolescents, Class Activities, Curriculum Development, Elementary School Teachers

Padak, Nancy D., Ed.; And Others (1990). Challenges in Reading: Twelfth Yearbook of the College Reading Association, 1990. This yearbook contains the following 24 articles on a variety of topics: "A Model for Diagnostic Narratives in Teacher Education" (B. J. Walker); "Teacher Expectations: Modifying One's Teaching through the Self-Monitoring Process" (T. R. Blair and D. L. Jones); "Preparing Teacher/Researchers" (M. W. Olson and M. K. Gillis); "Student Teacher Use of Content Reading Strategies" (E. G. Sturtevant and M. W. Spor); "Literature Study Groups in a University Methods Class" (D. Wells); "A Comparison of Ratings of Student Performance by Supervising Teachers, Reading Specialists, and Preservice Teachers" (J. R. Johnstone); "Early Reading Assessment and Teacher Decision-Making Practices in Kindergarten" (C. A. Hodges); "Process of Change in Teachers' Beliefs, Attitudes, and Concerns during a Series of Whole Language Reading and Writing Workshops" (O. Nelson and others); "Content Area Reading Practices: Relationships of Teacher Usage and Ability" (K. F. Thomas and S. D. Rinehart); "National Accreditation and Its Effect on the Literacy Professional: The Making of a Profession" (M. L. Hanes and J. Cassidy); "Invtd Splg Sts Thm Fre 2 Rit" (E. G. Pryor); "Methods and Approaches for Fostering Reading Fluency in Classroom and Clinic" (B. Walker and T. V. Rasinski); "Providing Mediated Instruction to Enhance Students' Note Taking and Reading Comprehension" (V. J. Risko and others); "A Comparison of the Effectiveness of Content Area Reading Strategies at the Elementary, Secondary, and Postsecondary Levels" (J. Swafford); "Involvement of University Faculty Members in Basal Reader Adoption Procedures" (B. D. Roe and E. P. Ross); "Informal Reading Inventories: A Holistic Consideration of the Instructional Level" (J. L. Johns); "Improving Disabled Readers' Summarization and Recognition of Expository Text Structure" (R. Weisberg and E. Balajthy); "Analysis of Cue Strategies of Disabled Readers" (B. M. Fleisher); "Criteria for Decisions: Best Methods for Whom?" (L. R. Putnam); "Developmental Education Students' Perceptions of Effective Teaching" (G. M. Padak and N. D. Padak); " At-Risk' College Students: Their Perceptions of Reading" (C. Gillespie and J. Powell); "Langston Hughes, Maya Angelou, and Malcolm X: Guides for College Developmental Writers in Search of a Voice" (J. K. Stadulis); "Learning Style Inventories: Efficiency Tools for College Instructors" (J. E.  Walker); and "Workplace Literacy: A Model for Program Development" (M. D. Siedow).   [More]  Descriptors: Elementary Secondary Education, Higher Education, Invented Spelling, Reading Diagnosis

John, Thomas (1976). Junior-Senior High Tutor-Aide Program at Malcolm X Elementary School: An Evaluation Study. Final Report. This two-year project used students at the junior and senior high school level as tutors to elementary students in the basic skills of math and reading. Tutor selection was based on continuing interest, attendance, scholastic achievement, and overall attitude toward the program. The final evaluative report includes the following information: (1) training methods and procedures instituted in the program; (2) findings based on the data collected from the project, including questionnaire responses from teachers and tutors; interview and observation of tutees, tutors and teachers; and test results as reported by the school system; (3) conclusions and specific recommendations for future programs. Thirty-six tables cover detailed results of the project as evaluated by tutors, tutees, and teachers. The final observation and recommendation is that the program represents a valuable new trend in the teaching-learning process and that the talents of high school and junior high school students were successfully channelled to minister to the needs of under-achieving elementary grade students.   [More]  Descriptors: Compensatory Education, Disadvantaged Youth, Elementary Schools, Formative Evaluation

Williams, LaJuana K., Ed. (1996). Exploring African and Latin American Relationships: Enhancing Cooperation and Eliminating Barriers. Annual Adult Education Research Symposium Proceedings (6th, Chicago, Illinois, April 13, 1996). Revised Edition. This document contains 14 papers presented at an annual symposium sponsored by Northern Illinois University's Department of Leadership and Educational Policy Studies and College of Education. First, information about the symposium's history and participants is presented. The following papers constitute the remainder of the document: "Eliminating Barriers through Language" (Rosita L. Marcano); "African-American Males Marshaling Self-Reliance through a Social Movement: The Million Man March" (Johnnie Crowder); "Black Liberation vs. Feminism in the Writings of Two Black Feminists" (Tarina Galloway); "Where Do We Stand? A Statistical Portrait of Latino and African-American Chicago" (Margaret Villanueva, Brian Erdman, Larry Howlett); "Building Bridges to Underserved Populations: Implications for African and Latin Americans" (William H. Young); "Afro-Latins in America" (Georges Germain); "Voter Empowerment and Adult Education: A Social Change Perspective" (James E. Hunt); "Removing the Barriers for the Economically Disadvantaged from Achieving Higher Education in Chile" (Ronald Everett, Rosita Marcano, Glenn Smith); "Infusing Diversity in a Research Course: A Social Constructivist Approach" (Wanda D. Bracy); "Building Bridges between Latina/o and African-American Leaders" (George Gutierrez, Mary Heather Hannah, Keith Armstrong); "Knowing Self, Communicating, and Integrating with Others in a Common Goal to Succeed through Education" (George Gutierrez, Sylvia Fuentes, Susan Timm); "Perspectives of African-American Enlisted Military Personnel on Military/Civilian Learning" (Patricia Easley, Pamela Jones); "Multicultural Experiences in Literary Consciousness: Lessons for African/Latin-American Alliances" (Sandra J. Rainey); and "Using Local and Ethnic Poetry to Improve Basic Writing Skills" (Jane Mueller Ungari).   [More]  Descriptors: Access to Education, Adult Education, American Indians, Blacks

Porter, Thomas J.; Hamilton, Edwin (1975). Junior-Senior High Tutor/Aide Program at Malcolm X Elementary School, ESEA Title III Evaluation. Final Report. This project proposes to select, train, and utilize junior and senior high school students from neighboring schools as tutors for their young peers and as aides to the instructional team. Projected results of the program are that tutees will improve skills in reading, math, and special interests; that there will be an increase in individualized instruction and specific assistance to the tutees; that self-image and self-concepts of tutor/aides and tutees will increase; and that there will be improvements in the teaching/learning environment. Since this evaluation comes at mid-point of a projected two-year project, major emphases of this evaluation focuses on the effectiveness of the program in the meeting the projected goals at mid-point and abstracting from the first year's experience that essential information needed for planning and decision making during the second project year. The evaluation methodology is discussed and results indicate: the project is on the way to meeting the goals, internal documentation is more than adequate, teachers indicate a positive effect on the instructional program, administration and management is sound, tutor/aides express satisfaction with roles, all students show an increase in reading and math skills, and teachers and tutor/aides are fairly congruent in their perceptions of the project. Descriptors: Disadvantaged Youth, Elementary Education, Elementary Schools, Formative Evaluation