Bibliography: Harriet Tubman (page 2 of 4)

This bibliography is selected and organized by the Black Lives & Me website.  Some of the authors featured on this page include Michael L. Wehmeyer, John W. Logan, San Francisco WestEd, Bill Bigelow, Santa Rosa National Women's History Project, William D. Pflaum, Nancy Lobb, Windsor National Women's History Project, Harilyn Rousso, and Michelle Commeyras.

National Women's History Project, Windsor, CA. (1994). Myself and Women Heroes in My World. National Women's History Project. This guide presents biographies of the following women: Sojourner Truth, Harriet Tubman, Queen Liliuokalani, Amelia Earhart, Maria Tallchief, and Sonia Manzano. The use of biographies as history provides historical information and role models in a form comprehensible to young students. The personal history booklet that concludes this document serves as a guide to help students understand that they, too, will have a role in history. It basically demonstrates to students that people like themselves can make history. Descriptors: Curriculum Guides, Elementary Education, Females, Social Studies

Rousso, Harilyn, Ed.; Wehmeyer, Michael L., Ed. (2001). Double Jeopardy: Addressing Gender Equity in Special Education. SUNY Series, the Social Context of Education. Highlighting the educational issues of girls and young women with disabilities, this book examines how they are exposed to discrimination based on gender and disability/special education status, and how they experience less successful vocational outcomes than males with disabilities and typical female peers upon leaving school. It also describes innovative programs and strategies designed to empower youth with disabilities. Chapters include: (1) "Beyond Pedestals: The Lives of Girls and Women with Disabilities" (Adrienne Asch and others); (2) "Won't You Know All of Me? Recognizing the Confluence of Disability, Gender and Ethnicity" (Eric Jolly); (3) "Gender Equity in Education: Change and Challenge" (Katherine Hanson and Susan J. Smith); (4) "Title IX: What Does It Mean for Teachers?" (Melissa Keyes); (5) "She Bakes and He Builds: Gender Bias in the Curriculum" (Susan Shaffer and Linda Shevitz); (6) "Can She Really Do Science? Gender Disparities in Math and Science Education" (Ellen Wahl); (7) "Squeaky Wheels versus Invisibility: Gender Bias in Teacher-Student Interactions" (Dolores A. Grayson); (8) "Stopping Sexual Harassment in Schools" (Eleanor Linn and Harilyn Rousso); (9) "Schools Fail Boys Too: Exposing the Con of Traditional Masculinity" (Craig Flood); (10) "Teaching as though Both Genders Count: Guidelines for Designing Nonsexist Inclusive Curricula" (Theresa Mickey McCormick); (11) "Uncovering Bias in the Classroom: A Personal Journey" (Maryann Wickett); (12) "Research on Gender Bias in Special Education Services" (Michael L. Wehmeyer and Michelle Schwartz); (13) "Gender Equity Issues in the Vocational and Transition Services and Employment Outcomes Experienced by Young Women with Disabilities" (Bonnie Doren and Michael Benz); (14) "Nothing To Do after School: More of an Issue for Girls" (Merle Froschl and others); (15) "What Do Frida Kahlo, Wilma Mankiller, and Harriet Tubman Have in Common? Providing Role Models for Girls with (and without) Disabilities" (Harilyn Rousso); (16) "The Living Out Loud Program: Building Resiliency in Adolescent Girls with Disabilities" (Nancy Ferreyra and Estelle Eskenazi); and (17) "Addressing Gender Equity in Special Education Services: An Agenda for the Twenty-First Century" (Michael L. Wehmeyer and Harilyn Rousso). (Chapters include references.) Descriptors: Attitudes toward Disabilities, Classroom Environment, Curriculum Design, Disabilities

WestEd, San Francisco, CA. (1996). From Paper to Practice: Challenges Facing a California Charter School. A Report Presented to the San Diego Unified School Board. Technical Report. Signed into law on September 2, 1992, California's charter-school law has led to the approval of over 100 charter schools. San Diego City Schools (SDCS) was one of the first districts to sponsor charter schools, including the Harriet Tubman School, 1 year after the law became effective. This report provides a brief overview and summary of a case study-report of the charter school at Harriet Tubman Village operating since September, 1994. Data were derived from document analysis; a review of literature; parent questionnaires (81 out of 180 parents, a 45 percent response rate); classroom observations; and interviews with school district staff, school administrators, school board members, teachers, and parents. The background and context section recounts a brief history of the Tubman school from its inception. Findings are presented for four areas of interest–educational program, teacher characteristics and beliefs, governance and other issues, and parent perspectives. The following conclusions are made: (1) The lines of authority and liability between charter schools and the district are ambiguous; (2) the review and approval process did not produce a charter that is clearly consistent with the legislation or the school district's requirements; (3) the charter-school petition inadequately describes the school's educational program; (4) teachers express some of the concepts and teach some of the content that the petition describes; (5) standardized tests are driving significant adaptations in the educational programs; (6) the Tubman Governance Council has been partially inhibited because its authority is not clearly delineated; (7) governance council members had to grapple with serious and complex issues, often without an experienced leader; and (8) the principles of choice may be compromised if parents are not fully knowledgeable about the nature of Tubman's program and their other options. Recommendations are offered for autonomy and accountability issues, the education program, improved governance, ensuring informed parental choice, and future evaluation. Six tables and eight figures are included. Appendices contain the text of California charter school law, the San Diego Charter School Study: Guiding Framework, the methodological framework and notes, and parent responses. (Contains 16 references.)   [More]  Descriptors: Accountability, Charter Schools, Educational Assessment, Elementary Secondary Education

WestEd, San Francisco, CA. (1996). From Paper to Practice: Challenges Facing a California Charter School. A Report Presented to the San Diego Unified School Board. Executive Summary. Signed into law on September 2, 1992, California's charter-school law has led to the approval of over 100 charter schools. San Diego City Schools (SDCS) was one of the first districts to sponsor charter schools, including the Harriet Tubman School, 1 year after the law became effective. This document provides a brief overview and summary of a case study-report of the charter school at Harriet Tubman Village operating since September, 1994. Data were derived from document analysis; a review of literature; parent questionnaires (81 out of 180 parents, a 45 percent response rate); classroom observation; and interviews with school district staff, school administrators, school board members, teachers, and parents. Findings are presented for four general areas–education program staff characteristics and beliefs, governance, and parent participation. The study found that: (1) The lines of authority and liability between charter schools and the district are ambiguous; (2) the review and approval process did not produce a charter that is clearly consistent with the legislation or the school district's requirements; (3) the charter-school petition inadequately describes the school's educational program; (4) teachers express some of the concepts and teach some of the content that the petition describes; (5) standardized tests are driving significant adaptations in the educational programs; (6) the Tubman Governance Council has been partially inhibited because its authority is not clearly delineated; (7) governance council members had to grapple with serious and complex issues, often without an experienced leader; and (8) the principals of choice may be compromised if parents are not fully knowledgeable about the nature of Tubman's program and their other options. Recommendations are offered for improving the education program, governance, parental choice, and evaluation. (Contains 10 endnotes).   [More]  Descriptors: Accountability, Charter Schools, Educational Assessment, Elementary Secondary Education

National Women's History Project, Santa Rosa, CA. (1985). Myself and Women Heroes in My World. Kindergarten Social Studies: Sojourner Truth, Harriet Tubman, Queen Liliuokalani, Amelia Earhart, Maria Tallchief, [and] Sonia Manzano. Part of the National Women's History Project funded to promote the multi-cultural study of women in history, this unit will help kindergarten students learn about the contributions that women have made to U.S. society. The developers believe that equality cannot be achieved until equality is expected and until the contributions of all women are understood and accepted as a simple matter of fact. The unit contains six lessons based on biographies of women who represent the many ways in which women have been and continue to be heroes. The women are Amelia Earhart, Queen Liliuokalani, Sonia Manzano, Maria Tallchief, and Sojourner Truth, representing major ethnic groups, and Harriet Tubman as a representative of disabled women. Each unit begins with a biography that teachers are to read to students. Discussion questions and suggestions for classroom activities follow each biography. Student materials are provided. Examples of activities include having children retell the story in their own words, play games, sing songs, and participate in class discussions. A bibliography of additional resource materials dealing with each woman concludes the unit.   [More]  Descriptors: American Indians, Biographies, Blacks, Cultural Background

Bigelow, Bill, Ed. (2004). Rethinking Our Classrooms: Teaching for Equity and Justice. Volume 2. Revised Edition, Rethinking Schools, Ltd. With more than 180,000 copies in print, the first volume of "Rethinking Our Classrooms" broke new ground, providing teachers with hands-on ways to promote values of community, justice, and equality–and build students' academic skills. This companion volume continues in that tradition, presenting a rich new collection of from-the-classroom articles, curriculum ideas, lesson plans, poetry, and resources–all grounded in the realities of school life. "Rethinking Our Classrooms, Volume 2" is an essential book for every educator who seeks to pair concerns for social justice with students' academic achievement. This book is divided into six parts. Part I, The Power of Words, contains the following: (1) Where I'm From: Inviting Students' Lives into the Classroom (Linda Christensen); (2) "Where I'm From" (George Ella Lyon); (3) "I Am From Soul Food and Harriet Tubman" (Lealonni Blake); (4) "I Am From Pink Tights and Speak Your Mind" (Djamila Moore); (5) "I Am From …" (Oretha Storey); (6) "I Am From Swingsets and Jungle Gyms" (Deb Gordon); (7) An International Proverbs Project (Jim Cummins and Dennis Sayers); (8) "Race" (Cang Dao); (9) For My People (Linda Christensen); (10) What Color Is Beautiful? (Alejandro Segura-Mora); (11) Ebonics and Culturally Responsive Instruction (Lisa Delpit); (12) Exploring Black Cultural Issues (Bakari Chavanu); (13) "Ode to Writing" (Jessica Rawlins); and (14) "I am Proud to Be Bilingual" (Monica Thao). Part II, The Power of the Past, contains the following: (15) Unsung Heroes (Howard Zinn); (16) Teaching About Unsung Heroes (Bill Bigelow); (17) Discovering the Truth about Helen Keller (James Loewen); (18) On the Road to Cultural Bias (Bill Bigelow); (19) Fiction Posing as Truth (Debbie Reese, et al.); (20) Rethinking the U.S. Constitutional Convention: A Role Play (Bob Peterson); (21) A New U.S. Bill of Rights (Larry Miller); (22) "Waiting at the Railroad Cafe" (Janet Wong); (23) A Lesson on the Japanese-American Internment (Mark Sweeting); (24) "In Response to Executive Order 9066" (Dwight Okita); and (25) What the Tour Guide Didn't Tell Me (Wayne Au). Part III, The Power of Critique, contains the following: (26) Ten Chairs of Inequality (Polly Kellogg); (27) Teaching Math Across the Curriculum (Bob Peterson); (28) Percent as a Tool for Social Justice (Bob Peterson); (29) The Human Lives Behind the Labels (Bill Bigelow); (30) "The Stitching Shed" (Tho Dong); (31) Bias and CD-ROM Encyclopedias (Bob Peterson); (32) Where's the "R" Word? (Bob Peterson); (33) Girls, Worms, and Body Image (Kate Lyman); and (34) Math, Maps, and Misrepresentation (Eric Gutstein). Part IV, The Power of Social Action, contains the following: (35) "We Had Set Ourselves Free" (Doug Sherman); (36) From Snarling Dogs to Bloody Sunday (Kate Lyman); (37) Mississippi Freedom Schools (David Levine); (38) Improvs and Civil Rights (Bill Bigelow); (39) The Poetry of Protest (Linda Christensen); (40) "Jorge the Church Janitor Finally Quits" (Martin Espada); (41) A Bill of Rights for Girls (Mary Blalock); (42) The Trial (Kate Lyman); (43) Students Blow the Whistle on Toxic Oil Contamination (Larry Miller and Danah Opland-Dobs); (44) "Garbage" (Bill Steele, Mike Agranoff, and Pete Seeger); (45) AIDS–"You Can Die From It" (Kate Lyman); and (46) "At the Cemetery, Walnut Grove Plantation, South Carolina, 1989" (Lucille Clifton). Part V, Rethinking School Culture, contains the following: (47) When Things Turn Ugly (Donn Harris); (48) Rethinking Discipline (Jehanne Helena Beaton); (49) Creating Classroom Community (Beverly Braxton); (50) A Mother Speaks Out (Leslie Sadasivan); (51) Teaching the Whole Story (Kate Lyman); (52) Playing Favorites (Mara Sapon-Shevin); (53) Black Teachers on Teaching (Michele Foster); (54) School System Shock (Melony Swasey); (55) Arranged Marriages, Rearranged Ideas (Stan Karp); (56) Out Front (Annie Johnston); (57) Staying Past Wednesday (Kate Lyman); and (58) "Earth's Last Cry" (Rachel M. Knudsen). Part VI, Rethinking Assessment, contains the following: (59) Why the Testing Craze Won't Fix Our Schools; (60) Basketball and Portfolios (Linda Christensen); (61) One Size Fits Few (Susan Ohanian); (62) Tracking and the Project Method (Bob Peterson); (63) Motivating Students to do Quality Work (Bob Peterson); (64) Resources; and (65) Poetry Teaching Guide (Linda Christensen). An index is included. [For "Rethinking Our Classrooms: Teaching for Equity and Justice. Volume 1. New Edition–Revised and Expanded," see ED521822.]   [More]  Descriptors: Social Justice, United States History, School Culture, Females

Jones, Richard (1990). Four Who Dared: Women Who Made History in Rensselaer County. Designed to dramatize constitutional issues in the history of Rensselaer County, New York, the struggle for women's rights is the focus of this play that is intended for fourth grade students as part of their local history curriculum. The play has four objectives: to enable students to understand the meaning of inequality, to show how the lives of women and blacks were affected by inequality, to illustrate how ideas about changing women's lives differed, and to relate past inequalities to the present. The play itself involves four famous pioneers in the struggle for equal rights for women–Emma Willard, Susan B. Anthony, Harriet Tubman, and Kate Mullaney–each of whom had a connection to Rensselaer County. Descriptors: Constitutional History, Dramatics, Feminism, Grade 4

Morris-Lipsman, Arlene J. (1990). Notable Women: Grades 4-6. These lesson plans compose a classroom guide to teach about notable women in history. Traditionally, many fields were closed to women and only recently have women made strides in achieving professional careers. Some women, however, succeeded in becoming known throughout the world and became pioneers in their respective fields. The lives and career struggles of 23 successful women are used as the foundation for lessons and models for classroom teaching. Discussion questions are included with each of the individual biographies and each unit encourages students to question and imagine the struggles women encountered. Each segment reinforces key concepts and all activities emphasize critical and creative thinking skills involving written, oral, dramatic and art projects. Students also are asked to complete a chart comparing the lives of the women presented. Included among the 23 biographies are Louisa May Alcott, Benazir Bhutto, Amelia Earhart, Sandra Day O'Conner, Sally Ride, Eleanor Roosevelt, and Harriet Tubman. Descriptors: Biographies, Creative Thinking, Critical Thinking, Curriculum Enrichment

Garcia, Jesus; Logan, John W. (1983). Teaching Social Studies Using Basal Readers, Social Education. A lesson, "Harriet Tubman: A Most Successful Conductor," illustrates how to employ a basal reader in social studies instruction in the elementary grades. This approach offers students a relevant curriculum, greater opportunities for concept development, practice in skills areas, and activities that offer greater opportunity to master social studies objectives. Descriptors: Basal Reading, Concept Teaching, Content Area Reading, Educational Objectives

National Women's History Project, Windsor, CA. (1992). Las Heroinas en el Mundo Mio y Yo (Myself and Women Heroes in My World). This book offers a series of lesson plans and resources for teaching young learners (K-3) about heroines in U.S. history. The book offers general guidelines for presentation of the materials as well as specific suggestions for individual lessons. Each lesson focuses on a particular historical figure and includes a biography, a lesson plan outline, sample discussion questions, and reproducible visual aids. The women explored in the guide are: Sojourner Truth, Harriet Tubman, Queen Liliuokalani, Amelia Earhart, Maria Tallchief, and Sonia Manzano. The final activity involves the student creating a personal history. Both the text and the materials are in Spanish. Descriptors: Bilingual Education, Elementary Education, Females, Primary Education

1996 (1996). African Americans Who Made a Difference. 15 Plays for the Classroom. These easy-to-read classroom plays are about 15 African American men and women in a variety of vocations. The plays are designed to enhance the curriculum and to make social studies come alive for the student as they bolster language-arts teaching. Each play includes a Teacher's Guide that contains some quotes from the featured person and a brief biography. A bibliography lists age-appropriate titles to help children learn more about these people. The guide ends with activities designed to strengthen students' thinking, oral, writing, and research skills. The plays are about: (1) Alvin Ailey, Jr.; (2) Romare Bearden; (3) George Washington Carver; (4) Shirley Chisholm; (5) Frederick Douglass; (6) Langston Hughes; (7) Martin Luther King, Jr.; (8) Thurgood Marshall; (9) Rosa Parks; (10) Jackie Robinson; (11) Sojourner Truth; (12) Harriet Tubman; (13) Ida B. Wells-Barnett; (14) Phillis Wheatley; and (15) Malcolm X. Descriptors: Biographies, Blacks, Cultural Awareness, Cultural Enrichment

Pflaum, William D. (2004). The Technology Fix: The Promise and Reality of Computers in Our Schools, Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development. During the technology boom of the 1980s and 1990s, computers seemed set to revolutionize education. Do any of these promises sound familiar? (1) Technology would help all students learn better, thanks to multimedia programs capable of adapting to individual needs, learning styles, and skill levels; (2) Technology would transform the teacher's role from a purveyor of a one-size-fits-all curriculum to a facilitator of student exploration; (3) Technology would replace textbooks with dynamic, interactive learning resources that were always up-to-date; and (4) Technology would boost test scores, as engaged and motivated students acquired advanced skills, problem-solving abilities, and a growing thirst for knowledge. By 2001, educational materials developer William D. Pflaum had begun to suspect that technology was not the all-purpose solution it had seemed. Deciding to see how computers were really being used in U.S. classrooms, he embarked on a yearlong road trip to a cross-section of schools throughout the nation. In this book, he recounts his journey. Although he did find technology application to admire, too often he found broken promises: millions spent for little measurable gain, problems instead of solutions, a fix instead of a fix. This inside look at computer use in our schools shares the voices, experiences, triumphs, and frustrations of educators and students in urban, rural, and suburban settings. The author provides insight into the key roles that computers play in the classroom and clarifies what must be done to ensure that the promise of technology is fulfilled… and that students truly benefit. This book is organized into five parts. Part I, Commitment and Focus, includes the following chapters: (1) St. Mary's Elementary School; (2) Harriet Tubman Elementary School; (3) Longworth High School; (4) Washington-Connors Elementary School; and (5) Mitchell Elementary School. Part II, Commitment, Less Focus, presents the next series of chapters: (6) St. John's High School; (7) Longfellow Elementary School; (8) Ludlow Springs School District; and (9) Western Hills School District. Part III, Hit-or-Miss Commitment, includes: (10) Springdale High School; (11) Harrison Elementary Schools; (12) Woodvale Middle School; (13) City Academy; (14) Emerson Elementary School; (15) Lambert Elementary School; and (16) Carter Elementary School. Part IV, Too Troubled to Focus, presents: (17) Alexanderville School District; (18) Porter Elementary School; (19) Fisher High School; and (20) Lincoln Elementary School. Part V, Conclusions and Next Steps, contains the final two chapters of the book: (21) Computer Use in the Classroom; and (22) So What Should We Do? An index and a section with information about the author are also included.   [More]  Descriptors: Teaching Methods, Elementary Secondary Education, Technology Integration, Case Studies

Stoloff, David L. (1998). Developing Educational Signposts on the World Wide Web: A School-University Cooperative Curriculum Project. This project's goal was to develop a network of educational signposts and electronic textbooks to support K-12 student learning and curriculum articulation across eastern Connecticut and to enhance teacher education and graduate programs at Eastern Connecticut State University (ECSU). Through support from an AAUP-CSU grant, selected ECSU graduate students who were also K- 12 teachers in the region attended a summer workshop that focused on the development of web pages for the World Wide Web and commitment to integrating the World Wide Web into their curriculum. Participants learned how to use the World Wide Web and how to create home pages and electronic text. They developed a variety of electronic textbooks and school home pages. Project linkage titles included: "Find it on the World Wide Web,""Online Resources for Educators New to the Internet,""K12Links,""Curriculum Enhancement,""Newspapers in Education,""Glen Lessig's Education Technology Bookmarks,""Arline Mykietyn's Bookmarks on Harriet Tubman,""J.P.'s Eclectic Bookmarks," and "Mrs. Wargo's Bookmarks WJJS Media Center."   [More]  Descriptors: College School Cooperation, Computer Uses in Education, Curriculum Development, Electronic Text

Commeyras, Michelle (1995). What Can We Learn from Students' Questions?, Theory into Practice. Creating opportunities and encouraging student-centered questioning requires a special teacher-student dynamic. Students need to be empowered to ask questions. The article explores what teachers can learn from questions students ask, focusing on learning outcomes for teachers, and using a second-grade lesson on Harriet Tubman as an example. Descriptors: Classroom Communication, Constructivism (Learning), Discovery Learning, Discussion (Teaching Technique)

Lobb, Nancy (1995). 16 Extraordinary African Americans. This collection for children tells the stories of 16 African Americans who helped make America what it is today. African Americans can take pride in the heritage of these contributors to society. Biographies are given for the following: (1) Sojourner Truth, preacher and abolitionist; (2) Frederick Douglass, abolitionist; (3) Harriet Tubman, leader in helping slaves escape; (4) Ida B. Wells-Barnett, journalist; (5) Mary McLeod Bethune, educator; (6) Booker T. Washington, educator and founder of Tuskegee Institute; (7) W. E. B. Du Bois, scholar and advocate of black rights; (8) George Washington Carver, botanist; (9) Jackie Robinson, baseball star; (10) Thurgood Marshall, Supreme Court Justice; (11) Shirley Chisholm, Congresswoman; (12) Martin Luther King, Jr., civil rights leader; (13) Malcolm X, black rights leader; (14) Marian Wright Edelman, child advocate; (15) Jesse Jackson, civil rights leader; and (16) Maya Angelou, author and poet. Questions and activities for further learning and guidelines for teachers are included. Descriptors: Black Culture, Black History, Blacks, Childrens Literature

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