Bibliography: African Americans (page 1192 of 1351)

This annotated bibliography is compiled and customized by the Center for Positive Practices for the Black Lives & Me website.  Some of the authors featured on this page include Brandon Guidry, Rosann Tung, Sara McAlister, Farrah B. Mann, Anne Marshall, Joy Ann Williamson, Roy L. Johnson, Viv Gardner, Scott A. Ginder, and Inc. ACT.

Miranda, Helena P.; Mokhtar, Christina; Tung, Rosann; Ward, Ray; French, Dan; McAlister, Sara; Marshall, Anne (2014). Opportunity and Equity: Enrollment and Outcomes of Black and Latino Males in Boston Public Schools, Annenberg Institute for School Reform at Brown University. This research study aims to better understand the diversity of experiences and backgrounds among Black and Latino male students in Boston Public Schools (BPS) by examining enrollment and outcomes of Black and Latino males relative to their female peers and their male peers from other racial backgrounds. Specifically, the authors designed this study to provide a more nuanced analysis of engagement and performance of Black and Latino male students by disaggregating enrollment and outcome data not only by major racial/ethnic groups, but also by geographical region of origin and by different racial groups within regions. A companion study will share case studies of BPS schools in which Black and Latino males perform well compared to BPS schools with similar demographics. Through this latter study, the authors aim to identify promising school and district practices and policies associated with increased engagement and improved outcomes for Black and Latino males. Two appendices include: (1) Data, Methods, and Limitations; and (2) Graphs for Data in Non-Exam Schools (SY2012). [This report was prepared by the Center for Collaborative Education and the Annenberg Institute for School Reform at Brown University on behalf of the Boston Public Schools. This Phase I report is part of a larger study, "Analyzing Enrollment, Outcomes, and Excellent Schools for Black and Latino Male Students in the Boston Public Schools."]   [More]  Descriptors: African American Students, Hispanic American Students, Males, Public Schools

Williamson, Joy Ann (2006). A Tale of Two Movements: The Power and Consequences of Misremembering "Brown", Yearbook of the National Society for the Study of Education. If, as James Anderson stated, a nation committed to democracy and equality has every reason to be ashamed on "Brown v. Board of Education's" 50th anniversary, why the commemoration and celebration? By revising Anderson's challenge to examine the complex role of "Brown" in the nation's memory and history, this chapter investigates how the decision and the broader black freedom struggle are memorialized, why the story is told in a particular way, and the consequences of that portrayal in understanding the nature of American democracy and equality. The first section of the chapter examines two of the historiographical tales of "Brown" and the black freedom struggle in the scholarly literature. The second part of the chapter investigates the treatment of the black freedom struggle and the "Brown" decision in high school history textbooks.   [More]  Descriptors: Freedom, Textbooks, Democracy, High Schools

Cinotto, Simone (2006). "Everyone Would Be around the Table": American Family Mealtimes in Historical Perspective, 1850-1960, New Directions for Child and Adolescent Development. The ideal of the proper family mealtime, originally devised by the Victorian middle class, gained cultural hegemony in modern America, but with the partial exception of the 1950s, only a minority of American families could ever live by it.   [More]  Descriptors: Middle Class, Cultural Influences, United States History, Sex Role

Xu, Jianzhong (2006). Worldview of One Black Family in a Middle School Inclusion Program: An Ethnographic Study, Teachers College Record. A growing number of schools have implemented inclusion programs for students with disabilities. Yet, there is hardly any acknowledgment of the presence of minorities in the inclusion implementation literature. This article uses ethnographic data to examine the experiences of one Black family in an urban middle school inclusion program. The study revealed that the school and the family held quite different worldviews regarding (a) academics versus social growth, (b) physical safety versus psychological safety, and (c) roles of the family, the child, and the school. In addition, the study revealed that the family's reactions were influenced by the inclusion program directly and by the school's desire to create an overall inclusive environment and that these parental reactions were further shaped by cultural lens and the power differential that existed between the family and the school. This article points to the critical importance of expanding the circle of current discourse on the realization of inclusion to include culturally diverse families, particularly because the data suggest that the longstanding power differential between the school and these families may intensify in inclusive settings.   [More]  Descriptors: Inclusive Schools, World Views, School Safety, African Americans

Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (2014). Closing the Gaps: 2014 Progress Report. College for All Texans. "Closing the Gaps: The Texas Higher Education Plan" was adopted in October 2000 by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (THECB). The goal of the "Closing the Gaps" ("CTG") plan is to close educational gaps in participation, success, excellence, and research within Texas and between Texas and other states by 2015. This 2014 progress report, the 12th annual progress report from the THECB, shows that many gaps have been closed or are within reach of being closed by 2015. The following topics are covered: (1) "Closing the Gaps" 2014 Progress Summary; (2) "Closing the Gaps" in Participation; (3) "Closing the Gaps" in Success; (4) "Closing the Gaps" in Excellence; (5) "Closing the Gaps" in Research; and (6) Higher Education Assistance for Identified High Schools. The following are appended: (1) Participation Data; (2) Success Data; and (3) Research Data.   [More]  Descriptors: Higher Education, Achievement Gap, Academic Achievement, Equal Education

Ginder, Scott A.; Kelly-Reid, Janice E.; Mann, Farrah B. (2014). Enrollment in Postsecondary Institutions, Fall 2013; Financial Statistics, Fiscal Year 2013; and Employees in Postsecondary Institutions, Fall 2013. First Look (Provisional Data). NCES 2015-012, National Center for Education Statistics. This "First Look" presents findings from the provisional data of the Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS) spring 2014 data collection, which included three survey components: (1) Enrollment at postsecondary institutions during fall 2013; (2) Finance, for the 2013 fiscal year; and (3) Human Resources at postsecondary institutions during fall 2013. Data for all components were collected through the IPEDS web-based data collection system. This "First Look" provides users with an opportunity to access fully reviewed, edited, and imputed IPEDS data. Final data, including revisions to the provisional data submitted by institutions after the close of data collection, will be available during the following collection year (2014-15). The purpose of this report is to introduce new data through the presentation of tables containing descriptive information. Selected findings have been chosen to demonstrate the range of information available when using the IPEDS data rather than to discuss all of the observed differences. The following are appended: (1) Data Collection Procedures; and (2) Glossary of IPEDS Terms.   [More]  Descriptors: Enrollment Trends, Postsecondary Education, Higher Education, Educational Finance

Waks, Leonard J. (2005). Brown V. Board, Common Citizenship, and the Limits of Curriculum, Journal of Curriculum and Supervision. Fifty years ago the Supreme Court in Brown v. Board, declaring education to be the foundation of good citizenship and preparation for occupational success, rejected the doctrine of "separate but equal" as applied to schools. The Court extended the American ideal of common education for common citizenship to black school children. Although much progress has been made, black Americans in large metropolitan areas are again becoming isolated. In many urban districts, 80 percent of the students are minorities. The black-white academic achievement gap, which had narrowed significantly between 1954 and 1988, has widened. Outsourcing of manufacturing jobs has pushed many black families out of the middle class. Few young black students are acquiring the skills needed to compete for "knowledge work." Educational reforms that fail to address these problems cannot advance common citizenship. Neither "excellence" nor multicultural approaches, by themselves, reduce racial isolation or promote knowledge-work skills. More fundamentally, the "grammar" of schooling and curriculum makes it difficult for any school curriculum to prepare students for knowledge work. New "postcurricular" designs for teaching and learning that reduce racial and ethnic isolation and foster knowledge-work skills are thus urgently needed. The idea of the "networked common school" offers a framework for achieving these aims and advancing common citizenship through education.   [More]  Descriptors: Court Litigation, Citizenship, Equal Education, African American Students

ACT, Inc. (2014). The Condition of STEM 2014. National. ACT has been a leader in measuring college and career readiness trends since 1959. Each August, they release "The Condition of College & Career Readiness" (www.act.org/newsroom/data/2014), their annual report on the progress of the ACT-tested graduating class relative to college readiness. Nationally, 57% of the 2014 graduating class took the ACT¬Æ college readiness assessment. The continued increase of test takers enhances the breadth and depth of the data pool, providing a comprehensive picture of the current college readiness levels of the graduating class as well as offering a glimpse of the emerging national educational and STEM pipeline. It also allows the review of various aspects of the ACT-tested 2014 graduating class. This report reviews the graduating class in the context of STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics)-related fields. ACT is uniquely positioned to deliver this report for two key reasons. First is our commitment to science by the inclusion of subject-level science tests in our assessments. Second is our research-based measure of interests, the ACT Interest Inventory, which is delivered with the ACT and determines inherent interest in occupations and majors. With the inventory, we can determine student interest levels in specific STEM fields and, more importantly, readiness in math and science among students interested in STEM careers. The report breaks the graduating class into three STEM-related cohorts: (1) Students who have an expressed and measured interest in STEM; (2) Students who have an expressed interest only–those who chose a major or occupation (out of the 294 listed in the Standard Profile Section of the ACT) that corresponds with STEM fields; and (3) Students who have a measured interest only–those who indicated STEM interest on the ACT Interest Inventory.   [More]  Descriptors: STEM Education, College Entrance Examinations, Science Interests, Student Interests

Gardner, Viv (2005). Contested Terrains: A Personal Journey through Image, (National) Identity and Ethics, Research in Drama Education. The essay deals with a Ugandan production of Brecht's Mother Courage and her Children and the issues raised when it travelled from Uganda to the United States, South Africa and back to Uganda. It explores the shift in perception and conception that happened/happens to both image and national identity when a production moved from one cultural context to another, and the demands that were made on the company in providing a mediating commentary for the production in each context. It also examines the issues–implicit and explicit–that emerged between the Ugandan and the European members of the company as the production moved between cultural contexts and funding agencies–each with their own agenda–changed.   [More]  Descriptors: Foreign Countries, Cultural Context, Audiences, African American Children

Villavicencio, Adriana; Klevan, Sarah; Guidry, Brandon; Wulach, Suzanne (2014). Promising Opportunities for Black and Latino Young Men: Findings from the Early Implementation of the Expanded Success Initiative. Technical Appendices, Research Alliance for New York City Schools. This appendix describes the data collection and analytic processes used to develop the findings in the report "Promising Opportunities for Black and Latino Young Men." A central challenge was creating an analytic framework that could be uniformly applied to all schools, despite the individualized nature of their Expanded Success Initiative (ESI) plans. Thus, the authors selected methods that would illuminate educators' perspectives on the initiative overall and highlight broad themes from the first year of implementation across ESI schools. The data collection started in the summer before the 2012-2013 school year, but primarily entailed school visits to 38 ESI schools in the spring of 2013, during which the authors conducted interviews and focus groups with principals, ESI design team leaders, and 9th grade teachers. They also administered a structured questionnaire to principals to collect information about the specific ESI programs at each school. Finally, they sought to contextualize this school-based fieldwork by interviewing members of the Department of Education's ESI team. This multi-layered qualitative research design was inspired first and foremost by an understanding of ESI as a schoolwide initiative. Each stakeholder type they focused on had a different role to play in ESI: Principals maintained budgetary oversight and provided the last word on high-level decisions related to ESI in their school; design team members developed the ESI plan and worked to ensure that all the pieces fit together; and teachers implemented specific programs. The interviews and focus groups were designed to elicit a range of perspectives on ESI's roll out and early implementation from individuals who were engaged in the work on a day-to-day basis. This paper describes the steps that were taken to collect and code data, identify prominent themes, and connect these themes to the larger goals of the initiative. [For the full report, see ED556044; for the executive summary, see ED556042.]   [More]  Descriptors: African Americans, Hispanic Americans, Males, Racial Differences

Villavicencio, Adriana; Klevan, Sarah; Guidry, Brandon; Wulach, Suzanne (2014). Promising Opportunities for Black and Latino Young Men: Findings from the Early Implementation of the Expanded Success Initiative. Report, Research Alliance for New York City Schools. In 2011, the New York City Mayor's Office, the Open Society Foundations, Bloomberg Philanthropies, and over 20 local agencies launched the Young Men's Initiative (YMI), a citywide effort to improve outcomes for Black and Latino young men in the areas of education, health, employment, and criminal justice. YMI is one of the single largest initiatives focused on Black and Latino males in the country, and it is at the forefront of a growing national movement to address the challenges these young men face in a more concerted way. This was exemplified by President Obama's recent launch of My Brother's Keeper, an initiative backed by government, businesses, and more than a dozen foundations that have committed $350 million toward identifying and expanding effective programs for young boys and men of color. Like others in this new generation of initiatives, YMI is attempting to tackle problems that have commonly been perceived as too large to fix. The core education component of YMI–the Expanded Success Initiative (ESI)–is designed to meet two related goals: (1) to increase college and career readiness among Black and Latino male students in participating high schools; and (2) to identify and disseminate effective strategies that might be replicated in other NYC schools and possibly other districts. While it is too soon to know if ESI is having an impact on student outcomes, this report provides a rich description of the first year of implementation (i.e., the 2012-2013 school year) at 38 of the 40 ESI schools. It focuses on elements that are integral to ESI's theory of action and were reported by school staff as having been the most promising for improving student outcomes and school culture. This information is intended to help ESI schools and the NYC Department of Education (DOE) as they refine programming and district-level support through the remainder of the initiative. More broadly, these findings and recommendations can inform efforts in other schools and districts working to better engage young men of color. The five chapters in this report are as follows: (1) Introduction; (2) Data Collection and Analysis; (3) District-Level Implementation; (4) Key Findings; and (5) Recommendations for Policy and Practice. [For the executive summary of this report, see ED556042; for the technical appendices, see ED556043.]   [More]  Descriptors: African Americans, Hispanic Americans, Males, Racial Differences

Johnson, Roy L.; Montes, Felix (2014). Texas Public School Attrition Study, 2013-14. IDRA Report, Intercultural Development Research Association. Since 1986, Intercultural Development Research Association (IDRA) has conducted an annual attrition study to track the number and percent of students in Texas who are lost from public secondary school enrollment prior to graduation. The study builds on the series of studies that began when IDRA conducted the first comprehensive study of school dropouts in Texas with the release of the initial study in October 1986. That study was the state's first major effort to assess the school holding power of Texas public schools and resulted in state-level policy reforms for the state education agency to count and report dropout data. IDRA is the only organization that has examined Texas attrition rates consistently, with the same methodology, since 1986. The annual attrition studies released by IDRA include county-level data by race and ethnicity. Trend graphs of high school attrition in each Texas county are available online. The study includes detailed findings, a supplemental analysis for reaching a rate of zero, and graphics showing different types of dropout data. IDRA's study also looks at the latest dropout study released by the Texas Education Agency and the National Center for Education Statistics. This report presents results of long-term trend assessments of attrition data in Texas public high schools. The following assessments and features are included in this report: (1) Texas Attrition Rate Dips One Percentage Point (Roy L. Johnson); (2) Types of Dropout Data Defined; (3) Texas Schools Projected to Lose 2.4 Million More Students before Attrition is Tamed (Felix Montes); (4) A Model for Success; (5) Taking Action to Hold on to Students; (6) 2012-13 Texas Education Agency Texas School Completion and Dropout Report (Roy L. Johnson); (7) Averaged Freshman Graduation Rate–Texas Tied for 22nd in On-Time Graduation in 2011-12 (Roy L. Johnson); and (8) Adjusted Cohort Graduation Rate Completion and Dropout Report (Roy L. Johnson). [Individual reports contain statistics, charts, and resources.] [For the 2011-12 report, see ED544323.]   [More]  Descriptors: Academic Persistence, Public Schools, Secondary School Students, Dropouts

Villavicencio, Adriana; Klevan, Sarah; Guidry, Brandon; Wulach, Suzanne (2014). Promising Opportunities for Black and Latino Young Men: Findings from the Early Implementation of the Expanded Success Initiative. Executive Summary, Research Alliance for New York City Schools. In 2011, the New York City Mayor's Office, the Open Society Foundations, Bloomberg Philanthropies, and over 20 local agencies launched the Young Men's Initiative (YMI), a citywide effort to improve outcomes for Black and Latino young men in the areas of education, health, employment, and criminal justice. YMI is one of the single largest initiatives focused on Black and Latino males in the country, and it is at the forefront of a growing national movement to address the challenges these young men face in a more concerted way. This was exemplified by President Obama's recent launch of My Brother's Keeper, an initiative backed by government, businesses, and more than a dozen foundations that have committed $350 million toward identifying and expanding effective programs for young boys and men of color. Like others in this new generation of initiatives, YMI is attempting to tackle problems that have commonly been perceived as too large to fix. The core education component of YMI–the Expanded Success Initiative (ESI)–is designed to meet two related goals: (1) to increase college and career readiness among Black and Latino male students in participating high schools; and (2) to identify and disseminate effective strategies that might be replicated in other NYC schools and possibly other districts. This executive summary presents highlights from the report, "Promising Opportunities for Black and Latino Young Men: Findings from the Early Implementation of the Expanded Success Initiative." While it is too soon to know if ESI is having an impact on student outcomes, the report provides a rich description of the first year of implementation (i.e., the 2012-2013 school year) at 38 of the 40 ESI schools. It focuses on elements that are integral to ESI's theory of action and were reported by school staff as having been the most promising for improving student outcomes and school culture. This information is intended to help ESI schools and the NYC Department of Education (DOE) as they refine programming and district-level support through the remainder of the initiative. More broadly, these findings and recommendations can inform efforts in other schools and districts working to better engage young men of color. [For the full report, see ED556044; for the technical appendices, see ED556043.]   [More]  Descriptors: African Americans, Hispanic Americans, Males, Racial Differences

Urban, Michael J., Ed.; Falvo, David A., Ed. (2016). Improving K-12 STEM Education Outcomes through Technological Integration, IGI Global. The application of technology in classroom settings has equipped educators with innovative tools and techniques for effective teaching practice. Integrating digital technologies at the elementary and secondary levels helps to enrich the students' learning experience and maximize competency in the areas of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. "Improving K-12 STEM Education Outcomes through Technological Integration" focuses on current research surrounding the effectiveness, performance, and benefits of incorporating various technological tools within science, technology, engineering, and mathematics classrooms. Focusing on evidence-based approaches and current educational innovations, this book is an essential reference source for teachers, teacher educators, and professionals interested in how emerging technologies are benefiting teaching and/or learning efficacy. Following a foreword (Loretta Jones) and a preface (Michael J. Urban, David A. Falvo), chapters include: (1) Using Technology to Enhance Science Literacy, Mathematics Literacy, or Technology Literacy: Focusing on Integrated STEM Concepts in a Digital Game (Isha DeCoito, and Tasha Richardson); (2) Media Literacy as a Pathway to Bridge the Digital and STEM Divides: Interest Driven Media Projects for Teachers in the Trenches (Lesley K. Smith, Juliette N. Rooney-Varga, Anne U. Gold, David J. Oonk, and Deb Morrison); (3) Sounding Out Science: Using Assistive Technology for Students with Learning Differences in Middle School Science Classes (Clement Vashkar Gomes, and Felicia Moore Mensah); (4) Promoting English Language Acquisition in Secondary Mathematics through Dialogic Integration of Instructional Technology (Bethany Reichen, Alandeom W. Oliveira, Gretchen Oliver, and Autumn Joy Florencio-Wain); (5) Examining the Levels of Reasoning Used by Urban Elementary Black Girls Engaging in Technology-Enhanced Inquiry (Gayle A. Buck, Nicole Beeman-Cadwallader, and Amy Trauth-Nare); (6) Motivating Inquiry-Based Learning Through a Combination of Physical and Virtual Computer-Based Laboratory Experiments in High School Science (Niwat Srisawasdi); (7) The Power of Computational Modeling and Simulation for Learning STEM Content in Middle and High Schools (Mahnaz Moallem, Shelby P. Morge, Sridhar Narayan, and Gene A. Tagliarini); (8) Visualizing Condensation: Integrating Animation-Developing Technology in Chemistry Classes (Sevil Akaygun); (9) STEM Learning in Middle Grades by Technology-Mediated Integration of Science and Mathematics: Results of Project SMILE (Pradeep Maxwell Dass, and John T. Spagnolo); (10) A Qualitative Study of Teachers' Understanding of Sustainability: Education for Sustainable Development (ESD), Dimensions of Sustainability, Environmental Protection (Hsiaowei Cristina Chang, Resa Marie Kelly, and Ellen P. Metzger); (11) Coupling Geospatial and Computer Modeling Technologies to Engage High School Students in Learning Urban Ecology (Dennis J. DeBay, Amie Patchen, Anne C. Vera Cruz, Paul E. Madden, Yang Xu, Meredith Houle, and Michael Barnett); (12) Using Technology to Rethink the Intersection of Statistics Education and Social Justice (Lisa L. Poling, Nirmala Naresh, and Tracy J. Goodson-Espy); (13) Using Authentic Earth Data in the K-12 Classroom (Meghan E. Marrero, Amanda M. Gunning, and Karen Woodruf); (14) Exploring Physics and Technology: A Study in Teaching Kinematics to Student-Athletes (Loraine Snead, and Yushaneen Simms); (15) Computer Programming in Elementary and Middle School: Connections across Content (Danielle Boyd Harlow, Hilary Dwyer, Alexandria K. Hansen, Charlotte Hill, Ashley Iveland, Anne E. Leak, and Diana M. Franklin); (16) Technology's Role in Supporting Elementary Preservice Teachers as They Teach: An Urban STEM Afterschool Enrichment Program (Anne Pfitzner Gatling); (17) Technology-Assisted Formative Assessment (Karen E. Irving); and (18) Using Reason Racer to Support Argumentation in Middle School Science Instruction (Marilyn Ault, Jana Craig-Hare, James D. Ellis, Janis Bulgren, Isa Kretschmer, and Bruce B. Frey). A section about the contributors and an index are included.   [More]  Descriptors: Elementary Secondary Education, STEM Education, Outcomes of Education, Technology Integration

Anderson, James D. (2006). A Tale of Two "Browns": Constitutional Equality and Unequal Education, Yearbook of the National Society for the Study of Education. Author Derrick Bell is not alone in wondering why "Brown v. Board of Education" commands such "awe and respect" in a nation where racial and ethnic groups remain separate and unequal in its public schools. Indeed, the ethnic disparities in academic achievement, the resegregation of public schools, and the ever-widening disparities in school funding overshadow most of the positive gains made over the past 50 years. This chapter seeks to assess "Brown's" place in the nation's memory and history, both its undeniably important role in their long struggle for equality under the law and its unfulfilled promises of racial desegregation and educational equality. This chapter has two basic objectives. First, the author examines the place and meaning of "Brown" in the larger struggle for individual and racial equality. Because "Brown" redeemed promises of constitutional equality that had been rejected since the Declaration of Independence, its legal significance is national in scope and its meaning extends beyond the interest of any particular ethnicity, class, or gender. The second objective of this chapter is to provide an understanding of how the particular implementation of and resistance to "Brown" impacted the struggle for equal education. It is widely acknowledged that "Brown's" direct impact on school desegregation and unequal education was limited and has become more circumscribed with each passing year.   [More]  Descriptors: Public Schools, Equal Education, Racial Integration, Ethnic Groups

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