Bibliography: Martin Luther King (page 26 of 26)

This bibliography is reformatted and customized by the Center for Positive Practices for the Black Lives & Me website. Some of the authors featured on this page include Kenneth Rodriguez, Elias Blake, Martin Luther King, Richard P. Boardman, Aimee Isgrig Horton, Donald L. Carter, C. Clyde Willias, Detroit District Court, and Herman Branson.

Horton, Aimee Isgrig (1989). The Highlander Folk School: A History of Its Major Programs, 1932-1961. Martin Luther King, Jr. and the Civil Rights Movement [Series]. This book reviews the history of the Highlander Folk School (Summerfield, Tennessee) and describes school programs that were developed to support Black and White southerners involved in social change. The Highlander Folk School was a small, residential adult education institution founded in 1932. The first section of the book provides background information on Myles Horton, the founder of the school, and on circumstances that led him to establish the school. Horton's experience growing up in the South, as well as his educational experience as a sociology and theology student, served to strengthen his dedication to democratic social change through education. The next four sections of the book describe the programs developed during the school's 30-year history, including educational programs for the unemployed and impoverished residents of Cumberland Mountain during the Great Depression; for new leaders in the southern industrial union movement during its critical period; for groups of small farmers when the National Farmers Union sought to organize in the South; and for adult and student leadership in the emerging civil rights movement. Horton's pragmatic leadership allowed educational programs to evolve in order to meet community needs. For example, Highlander's civil rights programs began with a workshop on school desegregation and evolved more broadly to prepare volunteers from civil rights groups to teach "citizenship schools," where Blacks could learn basic literacy skills needed to pass voter registration tests. Beginning in 1958, and until the school's charter was revoked and its property confiscated by the State of Tennessee in 1961, the school was under mounting attacks by highly-placed government leaders and others because of its support of the growing civil rights movement. Contains 270 references, chapter notes, and an index. Descriptors: Activism, Adult Education, Blacks, Change Agents

Willias, C. Clyde (1978). Myths and Realities Concerning the Black Colleges in Higher Education: A Lodestar for a Historical Analysis, Debate and Understanding: A Journal for the Study of Minority Americans' Economic, Political and Social Development. This article examines the present situation of black colleges in light of the history of black education in the United States. Education for blacks emerged from the limitations imposed by the slave experience, and by discrimination resulting from a segregated social system. Black colleges have always taken academically unprepared students and turned out graduates able to compete successfully with graduates from white institutions. However, the advent of the civil rights movement of the 1960s resulted in an examination of the status of higher education in the United States in general and of black colleges in particular. There was the mistaken belief that when white institutions started enrolling black students, black colleges would no longer be needed. Now, many black students and faculty members who had been attracted to white colleges in the 1960s and 1970s have returned to predominantly black campuses. If black colleges are to remain relevant, however, their traditional roles must be reexamined in light of recent social changes. To meet the needs of a variety of clientele, many black colleges are expanding their capabilities and creating programs in a wide range of fields new to these institutions. Descriptors: Black Colleges, Black Education, Black History, College Desegregation

King, Martin Luther, Jr. (1966). The Social Activist and Social Change. This paper calls for the involvement of social scientists in developing programs and directions for social change. Their research could illuminate the social reform aspects of the civil rights movement and the consequences of the movement on minority-group activists, nonparticipants, and the majority group. Studies could also be made of the effect of change on social institutions and of the problem areas in society in which there are racial inequalities. And because there is an immediate problem in the state of Negro schools, educators must use skills in reshaping unhealthy attitudes, in reevaluating school desegregation, and in establishing meaningful programs to benefit both advantaged and disadvantaged students. There is a special need for programs to halt the cumulative deficit in the intelligence of disadvantaged Negro children. Finally, the Negro family and community should be studied by social scientists so that guidelines for change may be developed. Reactions to this paper are included.   [More]  Descriptors: Action Research, Attitude Change, Behavioral Science Research, Black Community

District Court, Detroit, MI. Eastern District of Michigan Southern District. (1979). Martin Luther King Junior Elementary School Children, et. al., Plaintiffs, v. Ann Arbor School District Board, Defendant; Memorandum Opinion and Order. Civil Action No. 7-71861. This document contains the text of a United States District Court decision on a Michigan school district's proposed plan designed to help the teachers at a local elementary school (1) to identify those children who speak Black English and to determine the language spoken as a home or community language, and (2) to employ that knowledge in teaching such children how to read standard English. The plan was ruled acceptable by the Court on the basis that it complies with a Federal law which holds that no State shall deny equal educational opportunity to an individual because of the failure of an educational agency to take appropriate action to overcome language barriers that impede equal participation by its students in its educational programs. The text of the Ann Arbor School District Board plan is also included in this document. The plan details the method by which teachers will be provided, primarily through inservice training, with the skills necessary to identify speakers of Black English and to teach them to read standard English.   [More]  Descriptors: Black Dialects, Black Students, Board of Education Policy, Court Litigation

Carter, Donald L., Ed. (1978). Debate and Understanding–Symposium No. 4, 1978: Myths and Realities About Historically Black Colleges in Higher Education, Debate and Understanding: A Journal for the Study of Minority Americans' Economic, Political and Social Development. This journal contains articles reporting on different aspects of black higher education in the United States. A survey of myths about black colleges reveals that black colleges range from the strong to the weak, just as do white colleges, and that they are no more segregated than white colleges. An examination of the history of black education and the present situation of black colleges shows that graduates of black colleges were trained to serve the black community exclusively. Black colleges have continued to take academically unprepared students and turn out graduates able to compete successfully with graduates from white institutions. All this has been without much Federal aid until recently. No significant national commitment to the higher education of blacks existed prior to 1968. The role of black colleges is compensatory in terms of the continuing default of American higher education to be more responsive to the needs of black students. There is a special need to aid blacks so that they can take advantage of opportunities for study in science and engineering, since secondary schools are failing to prepare blacks for this kind of college work. Descriptors: Black Achievement, Black Colleges, Black Education, Black History

Boardman, Richard P. (1971). Community Involvement in School Desegregation: the Story of the Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. School/Providence, Rhode Island. A Report. This report describes the successful planning, development, and operation of a desegregated public elementary school in Providence, Rhode Island. Planning involved school system personnel and all segments of an ethnically mixed community. Physical structure and operation of the school were determined in response to educational needs and desires expressed by the community. This school has provided a model for other public schools in the area, which have adopted elements of the program and procedures of the school.   [More]  Descriptors: Community Involvement, Demonstration Programs, Educational Development, Educational Facilities

Branson, Herman (1978). A Prime Assessment for Black Colleges: Role of Blacks in the Sciences and Related Fields, Debate and Understanding: A Journal for the Study of Minority Americans' Economic, Political and Social Development. This article examines the need for blacks in science and engineering. From a review of the history of blacks as objects of scientific study from the 1790s to the present a better grasp of the problems confronting blacks can be gained by examining two fields: genetics and psychology. In genetic research on blacks, the results are used not by geneticists but by others; in psychology, some psychologists, especially educational psychologists, express the theory of inferiority in intelligence among blacks. Sickle cell anemia has been a topic of genetics research. The scores of blacks on IQ tests has been a topic for psychologists. Misuse of scientific data on blacks in these two fields can only be corrected if the number of blacks in higher education in the sciences and in engineering increases. For blacks, the career possibilities in the sciences and engineering appear inviting. Descriptors: Black Education, Black Students, Educational Opportunities, Engineering

Rodriguez, Kenneth (1995). We the People… The Citizen and the Constitution. Teacher's Guide [and Student's Guide]. Focusing on the history and principles of the U.S. Constitution and Bill of Rights, the high school text and teacher's guide are intended to be the basis of study for the competitive component of the "We the People… The Citizen and the Constitution" civic education program. The 40 lessons in the text are divided into 6 study units examining the philosophical and historical foundations of the U.S. political system; the creation of the U.S. Constitution; the impact of the values and principles embodied in the Constitution on U.S. institutions and practices; the development and expansion of the protections of the Bill of Rights; the meaning of the various rights guaranteed in the Bill of Rights; and the role of citizens in U.S. democracy. The text is based on a conceptually oriented approach that blends expository and inquiry methods, calling for active participation by students throughout. It stresses the development of analytic and evaluative skills, enabling students to apply basic substantive knowledge to a wide variety of political questions and controversies. The text includes a reference section containing: the Virginia Declaration of Rights; the Declaration of Independence; the Articles of Confederation; the Constitution of the United States of America; the Emancipation Proclamation; the Universal Declaration of Human Rights; Martin Luther King, Jr.'s Letter from Birmingham City Jail; and Biographical Notes. Focusing on the history and principles of the U.S. Constitution and Bill of Rights, this teacher's guide provides information and suggestions to help the teacher make the most effective use of the student text. The high school text is intended to be the basis of study for the competitive component of the "We the People… The Citizen and the Constitution" civic education program. The teachers' guide, like the student book, is organized into 40 lessons divided into 6 study units. The six units examine: the philosophical and historical foundations of the American political system; the creation of the constitution; the impact of the values and principles embodied in the Constitution on American institutions and practices; the development and expansion of the protections of the Bill of Rights; the meaning of the various rights guaranteed in the Bill of Rights; and the role of citizens in American democracy. The teacher's guide provides unit and lesson overviews and suggests instructional strategies. In addition to providing ideas for introducing lessons, additional information about lesson topics, and discussion questions, the guide presents a variety of individual, small, and whole group activities designed to reinforce or extend what students have learned in the lesson. These include suggested research projects, writing assignments, and reports, as well as student debates and simulation.   [More]  Descriptors: Citizenship Education, Constitutional History, Constitutional Law, Critical Thinking

Blake, Elias, Jr. (1978). The Black Protest Tradition of Historically Black Colleges: A Comparative Analysis of Historically Black and Historically White Institutions, Debate and Understanding: A Journal for the Study of Minority Americans' Economic, Political and Social Development. This article examines the forces of discrimination in institutions of higher education in the United States. Much of the literature on black education from the beginning of the century to Jensen's work has attempted to show the inherent inferiority of blacks. This literature has shaped the general public's view of black Americans and their education. Given the history of social science in America, it is not surprising that blacks cannot get their white colleagues to understand their views on the issue of equality of blacks and whites. Both black faculty and students report continued discrimination, both overt and covert, in white institutions. Within the public and private black colleges the tradition of supporting equality despite segregation continues. The role of black colleges is still compensatory in terms of the continuing default of American higher education to be more responsive. Support for black institutions has been uncertain and short-term. Prior to 1968, no significant national commitment to the higher education of blacks existed. Since then the Federal government has made this commitment. Descriptors: Black Colleges, Black Education, Black History, College Desegregation

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