Bibliography: Martin Luther King (page 22 of 26)

This bibliography is reformatted and customized by the Center for Positive Practices for the Black Lives & Me website. Some of the authors featured on this page include Washington Manpower Administration (DOL), M. Kimbrough Marshall, Chicago Great Books Foundation, John Ross Dixon, Princeton Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation, Judie Telfer, Linda R. Monk, AIMEE I. HORTON, Deborah L. Thompson, and Lynn H. Fox.

Fox, Lynn H.; Thompson, Deborah L. (1994). Bringing the Lab School Method to an Inner City School. A 5-day workshop for staff of an inner city school addressed the teaching approach of the Lab School of Washington (District of Columbia) and covered the nature of learning disabilities (LDs), tools to identify unique learning styles of students, and innovative teaching methods for all students with and without LDs. Eighteen elementary mainstream teachers from Martin Luther King, Jr. Elementary School (Washington, D.C.) and 2 administrators attended a 1-week workshop focusing on the application of teaching techniques designed for students with severe LDs to students who do not have a specific LD but might be academically unsuccessful because of lack of motivation and a history of failures. Special emphasis was placed on teaching content through multisensory methods, a holistic approach to language arts, infusing a wide range of art activities into the teaching of academic subjects, and understanding the model of multiple intelligences developed by Howard Gardner. Teachers had opportunities to observe summer classes for learning disabled and the "Academic Club" approach pioneered by Sally Smith. The teachers expressed a high degree of satisfaction with the workshop and interest in continued association with the Lab School and more workshops during the academic year, specifically additional instruction on the concepts of task analysis and diagnostic-prescriptive teaching. Appendices include: workshop topics, a teacher role questionnaire, and the Theoretical Orientation to Reading Profile.   [More]  Descriptors: Cognitive Style, Educational Practices, Educational Strategies, Elementary Education

Ramirez, Manuel, III (1995). Historical Development of the Concept of the Multicultural Personality: A Mixed Ethnic Heritage Perspective. The Mestizo (mixed ethnic heritage) Civil Rights Movement in the United States can be divided into five phases: Pre-Civil Rights, Civil Rights, Bilingual-Multicultural Education, Political Conservatism, and the current period, an Assault on Civil Rights. The paper describes how a personal research career has been influenced by the different stages of the Movement, and work on the concept of the multicultural personality has closely reflected its various phases. The Movement not only provided multicultural models such as Cesar Chavez, Malcolm X, Dolores Huerta, Martin Luther King, Jr., and Rosa Parks, it also provided a liberating force from racist, sexist, and cultural and genetic superiority paradigms of the social sciences. A personal account of the development of the concept of the multicultural personality is given, and a description of the instruments which were designed to assess multicultural personality processes is also provided. The anti-affirmative action trend of today's society impels one to look to the future in the hope that the Civil Rights flame will be rekindled so that multiculturalism can help save the world. (Contains 24 references. Three figures and nine tables are presented which are related to multicultural personality development and identity.)   [More]  Descriptors: Civil Rights, Cross Cultural Studies, Cultural Awareness, Cultural Background

Manpower Administration (DOL), Washington, DC. (1968). The Detroit Riot: A Profile of 500 Prisoners. Following the July 1967 riots in Detroit, 496 Negroes who had been arrested and imprisoned were questioned about their economic and employment status, family status, views about the riot and its causes, and rankings of Negro leaders. Negro interviewers conducted the survey at the prisons. Despite some stated shortcomings in the data collection process and in the instruments, a profile of these men is presented. The typical prisoner was a single man about 30 years old, protestant but not a regular church-goer, and a nonveteran high school dropout. He was southern born and had lived in Detroit for at least 15 years. A blue collar worker, he earned about $120 per week and had been out of work more than 5 weeks in the past year. The prisoner thought the riots had been caused by"police brutality." He believed that poor housing, lack of job opportunities, and discrimination also had contributed to the conflict. Martin Luther King, Jr. was his favorite leader, and nonviolence was the preferred means for achieving civil rights. In general, the prisoner felt that conditions for himself and other Detroit Negroes had improved recently, and he was hopeful of eventually achieving what whites now have. Tables summarize the data, and an appendix presents a profile of selected characteristics.   [More]  Descriptors: Black Leadership, Blacks, Economic Status, Educational Experience

HORTON, AIMEE I. (1966). AN ANALYSIS OF SELECTED PROGRAMS FOR THE TRAINING OF CIVIL RIGHTS AND COMMUNITY LEADERS IN THE SOUTH. THREE EXAMPLES OF RACIALLY INTEGRATED, RESIDENTIAL ADULT EDUCATION PROGRAMS CONDUCTED FOR THE TRAINING OF CIVIL RIGHTS AND COMMUNITY LEADERS IN THE SOUTH WERE EXAMINED. THE PROGRAMS STUDIED WERE (1) A 1955 WORKSHOP ON SCHOOL DESEGREGATION, ONE OF A SERIES OF WORKSHOPS DEVELOPED BY THE HIGHLANDER FOLK SCHOOL, AN ADULT EDUCATION CENTER IN RURAL TENNESSEE, (2) THE 1965 ANNUAL INSTITUTE OF RACE RELATIONS CONDUCTED BY THE RACE RELATIONS DEPARTMENT OF THE AMERICAN MISSIONARY ASSOCIATION AT FISK UNIVERSITY, NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE, AND (3) A 1965 CITIZENSHIP SCHOOL TEACHER TRAINING WORKSHOP SPONSORED BY THE SOUTHERN CHRISTIAN LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE, THE CIVIL RIGHTS ORGANIZATION HEADED BY DR. MARTIN LUTHER KING. EACH PROGRAM WAS EXAMINED AS A POTENTIAL MODEL FOR POSSIBLE USE BY INSTITUTIONS AND ORGANIZATIONS IN THE SOUTH CONCERNED WITH DEVELOPING LEADERSHIP TRAINING PROGRAMS. THE DATA ON WHICH THE DESCRIPTION AND ANALYSIS OF EACH OF THE THREE PROGRAMS WAS BASED DEALT WITH PROGRAM OBJECTIVES, EXAMPLES OF LEARNING EXPERIENCES USED TO OBTAIN THESE OBJECTIVES, STUDENT AND STAFF EVALUATION OF PROGRAMS, AND THE APPARENT EFFECT AND EFFECTIVENESS OF THE PROGRAMS AS VIEWED BY THE PARTICIPANTS. THE FIRST AND THIRD OF THE THREE PROGRAMS WERE JUDGED TO HAVE POTENTIAL USE AS MODELS IN OTHER INSTITUTIONS.   [More]  Descriptors: Black Leadership, Civil Rights, Comparative Analysis, Educational Programs

Kealey, Robert J. (1984). Everyday Issues Related to Justice and Other Gospel Values. This manual presents situations that occur in the lives of most children and suggests to the teacher related activities which might cause students to reflect on the deeper meaning and significance of the situations. It seeks to make the teacher, and thus students, aware of the fact that peace, justice, and other value issues are part of daily living. There are 31 lessons included, all of which are designed to be used whenever the appropriate situation comes up rather than in a fixed order, as well as two chapters addressed to the teacher which focus on the importance of values education and how to use these lessons. The lesson situations include: new students in class, culturally different students, the elderly, handicapped people, stealing, learning that a friend has stolen something, cheating in school, helping another student cheat, disagreement with a friend, unemployment, academic and athletic competition, the meaning of death, right to life, television commercials, destruction of property, the throw-away society, waste of food, assemblies, care of pets, loss of one's home through a disaster, embarrassing sickness, lack of volunteers, examination period, food drive, operation rice bowl, poking fun at other students, unkind nicknames, mimicking a physical handicap, school service project, Martin Luther King Day, and inaccurate language. Each activity includes the value to be taught, background, objective, and specific activities for primary and upper level students.   [More]  Descriptors: Catholic Schools, Catholics, Christianity, Curriculum Development

Great Books Foundation, Chicago, IL. (1995). A Gathering of Equals. A National Conversation on American Pluralism and Identity. Reading Selections [and] Guide for Leaders. This booklet contains texts of importance to all people with writings that have helped shape the U.S. identity. The texts are to serve as a springboard of discussion in a shared inquiry method of discussion of U.S. democracy. The documents in this volume include: (1) "The Declaration of Independence"; (2) "The United States Constitution: Preamble and Bill of Rights"; (3) "The Federalist #10 by James Madison"; (4) "Abraham Lincoln's Second Inaugural Address"; (5) "Letter from Birmingham Jail" by Martin Luther King, Jr.; and (6) "High School Graduation," from "I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings" by Maya Angelou. The guide is intended to help junior high and high school Great Books leaders enable their students to participate thoughtfully in "A Gathering of Equals: A National Conversation on American Pluralism and Identity." By study and reflection on the project readings followed by discussion of ideas, the shared inquiry approach exemplifies the principles upon which democracy is founded. The interpretive reading, writing, and discussion activities suggested in this guide will aid in planning a teaching schedule. Questions for discussion encompass both interpretive and evaluative aspects of the text. A 19-item bibliography of pertinent secondary readings is included, as well as a list of overarching questions on U.S. pluralism and identity.   [More]  Descriptors: Civil Liberties, Civil Rights, Cultural Interrelationships, Cultural Pluralism

Monk, Linda R., Ed. (1994). Ordinary Americans: U.S. History through the Eyes of Everyday People [and] Teacher's Guide. "Ordinary Americans" covers 500 years of U.S. history, from 1492 to 1992, in almost 200 readings, plus scores of archival photographs. The book relates the traditional events of U.S. history, but as an ordinary person lived it. Thus, the story of the Boston Tea Party is told not by Samuel Adams, but by George Hewes, a cobbler. The story of the Civil War draft is told not by General Robert E. Lee, but by Private Sam Watkins. The story of the 1965 civil rights march in Selma, Alabama, is told not by the Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr., but by Sheyann Webb, a 9-year-old. The goal of this book is to give voice to the many everyday people who shaped U.S. history, but whose names are seldom remembered. The teacher's guide incorporates a wide range of activities designed to supplement a course of study. All lessons involve group discussions, interactive activities, and student handouts to establish a common base of knowledge. This active learning approach motivates students to become interested in and involved with the heritage and personality of the United States. By using original resources and participating in a variety of learning activities, student learning of U.S. history is enhanced. The strategies for teaching these lessons include brainstorming, debate, panel discussion, classroom use of resources, role plays, small group learning, develop writing skills, and a final word regarding how "Ordinary Americans" enrich students' knowledge of U.S. history. Descriptors: Civics, Civil War (United States), Higher Education, History Instruction

Dixon, John Ross (1986). The Dropout Dilemma: Parenting in a Preventive Mode. Research has clearly shown a persistent and significant relationship between self-concept and academic achievement. A child's self-concept affects not only academic achievement and school performance, but personal and social adjustment and career development as well. Parent attitudes in the family environment, teacher attitudes in the school environment, and peer attitudes in the community environment all work together to form the child's self-concept and to influence his achievement. There are several ways to improve the quality of these three environments. In a quality family environment, the family is deeply involved in learning, psychologically close, and oriented toward the neighborhood and community. The children are able to govern themselves and solve problems with little parental intervention. Family conversations are clear and spontaneous, generally constructive, and have little distortion in them. Parents hear and encourage expressions of differences of opinion. While family members gain increasing independence with age, both parents remain active participants in family affairs. The school environment can also be improved. The Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Multi-Cultural Institute has a 16-point program objectives list to enhance the school self-image of each child. In the community, school, or home, children learn success through contact with successful people, through identifying with excellence, through positive feedback and through warm and accepting relationships with others. Descriptors: Academic Achievement, Adolescents, Child Development, Childhood Needs

Marshall, M. Kimbrough (1972). Law and Order in Grade 6-E: A Story of Chaos and Innovation in a Ghetto School. This book deals with the development and details of a variant of the open classroom technique, based upon the author's experiences as a sixth grade teacher at the Martin Luther King, Jr. Roxbury Massachusetts Middle School. The system has four major differences from conventional classrooms: (1) Kids sit in groups spread around the room rather than in rows; (2) Worksheets in seven subject areas–Mathematics, English, Social Studies, Spelling, Creative Writing, General, and Reading–are put in pockets scattered around the outside of the room every morning Monday through Thursday; (3) On these station days, the students are free to move around the room and do the worksheets in any order they like as long as they finish all seven by the end of the day; and, (4) the teacher's responsibilities are: (a) writing worksheets for seven subjects the night before and running off copies first thing in the morning; (b) moving around the room during the station time helping people with the work and any other problems; (c) planning other activities for the remaining part of the day after the stations are finished; (d) correcting the stations with the whole class in the last hour of the day; and, (e) evaluating progress in the traditional subjects weekly. Descriptors: Behavior Problems, Classroom Techniques, Disadvantaged Youth, Elementary Education

Munoz, Victoria I. (1995). Where "Something Catches": Work, Love, and Identity in Youth. SUNY Series, Identities in the Classroom. Using an innovative framework, a psychology of identity is explored by incorporating an analysis of the cultural, historical, and political context of youths from different regions of Puerto Rico. Interviews with 56 Puerto Rican youths who were either studying to work at something they felt strongly about, working at something they loved, or trying to find work after dropping out of school provide portraits of young people in personal transition. The book is conceptualized as a triptych, with the first "panel" being a description of the author's background and its relationship to the narratives of the youths interviewed. The second panel, the center piece, reviews Erik Erikson's ideas on identity, work, and love during youth. Martin Luther King's concept of "opera manum dei," the hands that do the work of God, is amplified in the discussion of work and love. The interviews presented in the second panel are further explored in the third panel's discussions of work, love, and identity. (Contains 1 table, 8 figures, and 86 references.) Descriptors: Adolescents, Cultural Awareness, Cultural Background, Dropouts

Brown, Frank (1982). School Integration in the 1980's: Resegregation and Black English. School integration, according to this ninth chapter in a book on school law, will take new forms for a variety of reasons. First, the U.S. Supreme Court has recently made basic changes that may have slowed down further school integration. The Court has stiffened its requirements for the right to sue, narrowed its interpretation of rules limiting the assertion of another individual's rights, and demanded that plaintiffs prove the laws they are relying on were designed to protect them. In addition, the Court has narrowed the rules for granting class action suits and in several cases has recommended no remedies for de facto segregated school districts if no intent by school officials to segregate was found. Second, black and white Americans nationwide are shifting their focus from reliance on school integration to quality of education. This shift is illustrated by a case in Michigan, "Martin Luther King Junior Elementary School Children v. Ann Arbor School District," in which the court held that one intent of the Equal Educational Opportunities Act of 1974 was to respond to suggestions that attention should be focused on better education rather than on busing. In consequence, the court ordered the school (80 percent white) to take appropriate action to overcome barriers experienced by children speaking "black English," who were impeded from equal participation in instructional programs. Descriptors: Black Dialects, Blacks, Compliance (Legal), Court Litigation

Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation, Princeton, NJ. (1975). Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation Reports for 1972-1973, 1973-1974. Recently the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation has conducted a variety of programs that support high quality in education. These programs are described in this report. The Administrative Intern Program, begun in 1967, selects young men and women with masters of Business Administration degree to serve on administrative staffs of colleges for minorities. The Martin Luther King, Jr. Fellowship Program, begun in 1968, enables black veterans to undertake graduate and professional training in preparation for careers in public service. The Woodrow Wilson Senior Fellows Program, begun in 1973, promotes greater understanding between the academic community and the world of action. Most recently the Foundation has added a program concerned with women's studies. The National Humanities Series was initiated by the National Endowment for the Humanities in June 1968 to create a pattern of disseminating the humanities to general adult audience throughout the U.S. The Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation conducts the series. The Dissertation Fellowship Programs enable students to complete the research and writing of their dissertations in their fourth year of graduate study. Also included in this report is a list of the Board of Trustees, officers and staff, a financial report, and the selection committees of the Fellowship Foundation.   [More]  Descriptors: Annual Reports, Business Administration, Fellowships, Graduate Study

Telfer, Judie (1973). Training Minority Journalists: A Case Study of the San Francisco Examiner Intern Program. In response to the Kerner Report, the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr., and the prodding of a few reporters on the staff, the "San Francisco Examiner" began an internship program in the summer of 1968. With some modifications, the program is continuing in 1973. By early 1971, 21 interns of minority background had completed the 13-week training program. At that time, nine were employed in the news media, three were in college, and one had just completed a move, five were not employed in the news field, and three were job hunting. All but two had considerable college background. By the summer of 1972, the program had added two interns in the regular series and had begun a summertime session. For the winter of 1972-73 plans called for two interns who would participate in 6-month sessions. The program has added, to date, at least nine members to the ranks of working minority journalists, some of whom would not be journalists at all were it not for the program. How was the program begun? How have interns been recruited? What are their backgrounds? How are they trained? How many have found jobs in the news media? Perhaps even more important, how do they feel about the program? And finally, how effective has the program been? In an attempt to answer these questions, the author interviewed individuals at the "Examiner" who have worked with the program in one capacity or another.   [More]  Descriptors: Bias, Case Studies, Employment Opportunities, Internship Programs

Cosseboom, Kathy (1972). Grosse Pointe, Michigan: Race Against Race. Grosse Pointe, Michigan, is a status community–but is it status quo? Yes and no. A bill proposed as a measure of community support for open housing opportunities got a definite "no" vote in Grosse Pointe Farms, although in opposition to State and Federal law precedents. The first Negro family who bought a Grosse Pointe home met with mixed reactions. Martin Luther King's appearance at a Grosse Pointe school met with the same mixed reaction. Black studies were incorporated in the high school curriculum, but the course's value and effectiveness was questioned or unknown. The school board promoted community college courses in the high school which might have brought blacks into greater contact with the community. Attempts to prevent this move failed; but its potential as a step toward removing the racial barrier remained unfulfilled. Surprisingly, private schools were more able to open their doors than public. Church programs brought blacks into the community and took whites to Detroit for attempts at understanding which occasionally led to more misunderstanding and further isolation. Grosse Pointe's sheltered nature disturbs its youth who have complained that they want to be prepared to face the wider world. Despite the leaders in merchandising, industry, labor, politics, and religion Grosse Pointe refuses to take the lead in bringing the races together. Descriptors: Community Attitudes, Community Characteristics, Community Leaders, Community Planning

Howard, John R. (1977). The Gifted Black Child: Problems and Promise. In this paper, it is noted that there are three reasons for studying the black gifted child. First, black destiny has in part been shaped by talented blacks–for example, Malcolm X and Martin Luther King. Second, the black gifted are a minority within a minority. The gifted black female, subject to sexism, is even more of a minority. Third, whether or not programs for the gifted should exist is not at question; they do exist and black children should participate fully in these programs. The black gifted child presents different problems from the white gifted child in terms of the following: (1) identification of the gifted and mislabeling; (2) the social milieu of the gifted, particularly family and peers; and (3) programs and possibilities for facilitating the identification and development of the black gifted. A short review of programs for the gifted, a list of Passow's five recommended steps for developing programs for the culturally different gifted, a short bibliography on the minority gifted, and a list of sources for information concerning the gifted and talented are included. Descriptors: Black Community, Black Education, Black Students, Black Youth

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